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Ragged University As An Agnostic, Open, Space For Discussion by Alex Dunedin

Ragged University is not about an organisation presiding over who gets to share or discuss ideas but much more a social enquiry into our means of learning. The notion that as an organised practice ‘Ragged University events’ are setting up people as authorities on subjects is a misapprehension of what is happening – events are situations where people have come together to share what they have invested their time in. Read more

Methodologies of Participation: Shared Anthropology, Corporate Parenting and Care Experience by John Morrison Part Two

This continues the presentation given by John Morrison exploring ‘Methodologies of Participation: Shared Anthropology, Corporate Parenting and Care Experience’. The first part contained an introduction to some of the themes and ideas which John explores and follows how he has laid out his PhD focusing on the participatory approach of Jean Rouch in Shared Anthropology.

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Methodologies of Participation: Shared Anthropology, Corporate Parenting and Care Experience by John Morrison Part One

This post includes an introduction, an audio recording and a transcript of John Morrison talking through the ideas he is bringing together in his PhD which involve shared anthropology and ethnofiction.  In particular he is interested to explore how these methodologies and techniques might be helpful in creating participatory circumstances for people with care experience to formulate the policy which informs what is being discussed as ‘corporate parenting’. Read more

Biases In Psychology Which Affect How People’s Intellectual Contribution Is Valued; Behavioural Reactions to Dissonance and Confirmation Bias

“Above all, don’t lie to yourself. The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, page 48

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Biases In Psychology Which Affect How People’s Intellectual Contribution Is Valued; Prejudicial and Biased Reasoning as Illogical and Irrational by Alex Dunedin

As a foundation to understanding why some people are listened to and valued, and why others are ignored and ‘un-valued’ [Dunedin, 2017], I have been scouring the field of psychology dedicated to studying the processes of dehumanisation. In this paper (series of posts) I am examining how the marginalisation of the contributions of others might indicate dehumanisation processes going on in the individuals and organisations who are in privileged positions. Read more