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Biases In Psychology Which Affect How People’s Intellectual Contribution Is Valued; Prejudicial and Biased Reasoning as Illogical and Irrational

This is the first of three essays examining biases which affect how people are valued.  The second part focuses on Implicit and Explicit Bias which commonly manifest in forms of racism.  As a foundation to understanding why some people are listened to and valued, and why others are ignored and ‘un-valued’ [Dunedin, 2017], I have been scouring the field of psychology dedicated to studying the processes of dehumanisation. Read more

Disaster Capitalism and War on Drugs: An Interview With Antony Loewenstein and Q+A Session at Recovering Justice

A key aim of Antony Loewenstein’s book and film ‘Disaster Capitalism’ is to examine and reveal the dark and manipulative sides of aid as something which is used to extract profit from misery and disaster.  This article covers an interview with Antony as he did a film screening followed by questions and answers at Recovering Justice in Newcastle.  Disaster capitalism is about how economies have risen out of exploiting war, the criminalisation of populations, illness, natural disaster, and vulnerabilities across the world and on our own doorstep. Read more

Investigating Attitudes Towards Aspects of Welfare Reform by Stephen McMurray

There has been an increasing political focus on the issue of benefit sanctions and their impact since the election of Jeremy Corbyn as the leader of the Labour Party and the success of Ken Loach’s film I, Daniel Blake. There have been significant changes in recent years to the UK welfare system implemented by the UK Government in London.  Read more

Impoverishment, Downsourcing and Buying Your Way Out: Action Research in Context by Alex Dunedin

In this essay I will be trying to drill down to the fine detail some of the what’s, how’s and why’s of ‘poverty’ are recreated in day to day behaviours and actions in the UK today.  For such an affluent nation brimming with endless numbers of charities, for me, significant questions are not being asked and significant acknowledgments are being avoided. This is part of an extended project focusing on how impoverished circumstances are created and recreated. This essay touches on the following points…

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Twas The Rant Before Christmas… What Makes The COOCs Initiative Succeed Where Others Fail by Alex Dunedin

The language of failure is a tricky one to use without creating unhelpful tensions which can compartmentalize the spirit and function of education and social projects. When walking through the surreal world of policy-town, phrases take root and oblige people to think and act in ways which conform to the language that is giving shape to their thoughts. Policy and it’s language has come to possess people’s practice.

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Education, Utopia, Necessity, and Existential Poverty by Alex Dunedin

This paper explores a perspective emerging from a community education project called Ragged University. The philosophical underpinnings of the project came as a response to necessity brought about by the existential poverty being created as a result of the process of enclosing the commons of the intellect. Read more

The Porous University, Socialisation and Reflections by Alex Dunedin

How are we to conceptualize the notion of the porous university ? The anchor point is understanding what we mean by university, for if we know what a university is we are then in a position to imagine how it might be porous, or what porous might mean in reference to such a thing.

My interpretations are salted with the things which have become meaningful to me, being someone who has never formally gone to university but however spent a great deal of time inside them, amongst the students, academics and general staff, as well as occupying the same terrain as these institutions in geographic and intellectual terms. Read more