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The Marketing Of Madness by Dina Poursanidou and Lou Rawcliffe

‘A Journey Into Light’?  Psychiatric Drug Promotion And The Marketing Of Madness by Dina Poursanidou and Lou Rawcliffe

Dina’s voice…

Last week, as part of carrying out research into women’s mental health at  Manchester University, a colleague and I visited  a Medium Secure Unit  for women in the North West for a meeting to discuss some training for mental health nurses on the sexual and reproductive health of  women  accessing  psychiatric  care.

Secure mental health services are defined as ‘specialist services providing treatment for adults with mental disorders including personality disorders that mean that they are at significant risk of harming themselves or others. In such services, patients are detained under the Mental Health Act 1983/2007 and many, but not all, will be convicted offenders. In this context, ‘secure’ relates to the range of physical, relational and procedural measures put in place to ensure the provision of a safe and secure environment in which to deliver treatment. Read more

Media Headlines Concerning Mental Health Service Users In England By Dina Poursanidou

Looking at media headlines from 2011 and 2012 concerning users of mental health services in England evokes in me a strong, odd sense of living and operating in two parallel and contradictory universe a sense of paradox that brings to mind Alice and her transportation from the boredom of her riverbank reality (she was sitting with her sister at a riverbank, the story goes) to the adventurous fantasy world of Wonderland Read more

Asylum: A Journey Through Madness and Back by Dina Poursanidou

How I became involved with the Asylum magazine and what such involvement has meant for me:  a journey through madness and back by Dina Poursanidou

My first encounter with the Asylum magazine occurred in the spring of 2010 – when the magazine was relaunched after a 3-year break. I was introduced to Asylum by Helen (Spandler), a friend and colleague from the University of Central Lancashire and member of the Asylum editorial collective, and I have been reading it religiously ever since. In the autumn of 2011 Helen asked me whether I would be interested in being involved in the Asylum editorial collective, stressing that ‘the collective is open to anyone who wants to help produce and develop the magazine, working in a spirit of equality’. I was pleased to be asked and I have been a member of the collective for about a year. Read more

Mad People’s History by Steve Tilley

Steve Tilley chose to speak about Mad People’s History course developed in Ryerson University, Toronto Canada and how it has reached out all over the world causing much discussion to happen around how we perceive mental health.

This time it is about first hand experience documented by people who have encountered the psychiatric system…The 12th June was a great night and benefited from having Steve share his vocation in plain: Good evening – Kirsten and I feel privileged to have this opportunity to tell you about projects we feel passionate about. I will tell you about two videos that form part of Mad People’s History, an online course from the Cheng School of Continuing Education at Ryerson University that won a Canadian award for best videography in an online course, last year. Read more

Oor Mad History by Kirsten Maclean

Kirsten made short talk at the 12th of June event.  She is a social historian and has been working on Oor Mad History a community history project about the history of activism by mental health service users in Lothian.  Service user led and supported by NHS Lothian, we look at ways of using community history and the arts to strengthen the service user voice and movement today and in the future.

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