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Categorical Thinking and the Narrowness of Rhetoric

Oh, what a week ! Sometimes it is that uphill struggle to get the most simple of things done. I find myself occasionally battling with people’s apathy and cynicism born of apathy, the inertia of the superstructures we work and live within, the anger of people reified from years past when they tried and failed to do something, and the desire to be recognised.

I remind myself what is possible by looking around to the buildings, the landscape; I go to the library and think of those with the perseverance and tenacity to have written their thoughts down and shared them. Read more

Great Educator: Thomas Henry Huxley 1825 to 1895

Thomas Henry Huxley’s research was so impressive that in 1851 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society; this however brought him no income. After a considerable career in the Navy as a voyaging surgeon, he left it to carry on his career in science.

Surely it would be the most undesirable thing in the world that one half of the population of this country should be accomplished men of letters with no tincture of science, and the other half should be men of science with no tincture of letters ?

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Inclusive Education and the Dialogue of Learning

I have been thinking about the nature of education and having been familiar with the noble aspects of this tenet of human society, I have not thought much about the negatives which it can manifest as. Francis Bacon is often attributed with having said ‘Knowledge is Power’. Regardless of who first said this, what is obvious is that it has become common currency as a phrase.

There are various ways in which this can be interpreted but one I like, which is not so commonly encountered is ‘Knowledge is only power when it is shared’. It was Francis Benton who told me this when she kindly consulted on the Ragged project at its inception.

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The Ways in Which We Do Things…

I was recently made aware of the most amazing practical demonstration of what motivation involves. Whilst reading through Andy Cranwell’s website, it struck me as interesting the way he approaches team building. He makes reference to The Fun Theory through, amongst other things, the piano stairs. This video is an impressive example of how the perception of the task defines the response to it. This rings true to me on a number of levels…

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