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Podcast: The Ragged Schools of Angel Meadows by Simon Ward

This is a podcast of when Simon Ward gave a talk on the Ragged Schools of Angel Meadows and Manchester.  In the early 1800s, state contribution to education was less than the amount the government spent on the King’s stables. This talk will look at how The Ragged School movement led to the 1870 Education Act and state funding of universal education.

This is a podcast of Simon Ward talking at the Ragged University where he takes a closer look at two of Manchester’s Ragged Schools. Their fascinating history takes us from basket weaving, badminton and bombs to Suffragettes and Coronation Street. Read more

The History of Ragged Schools in Angel Meadow and Manchester

Due to the rapid industrialisation and urbanisation in Britain, and in particular Manchester, there was a need for the support structure given by Ragged Schools. The Ragged Schools provided Sunday school teaching, basic education, food and clothing to children who were too “ragged” to go to normal Sunday schools and church services.

Ragged schools were mainly run on non-denominational lines by evangelical groups. Charles Dickens commented that these schools were “not sufficiently secular, presenting too many religious mysteries and difficulties, to minds not sufficiently prepared for their reception”[1]. Read more