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Ragged University As An Agnostic, Open, Space For Discussion by Alex Dunedin

Ragged University is not about an organisation presiding over who gets to share or discuss ideas but much more a social enquiry into our means of learning. The notion that as an organised practice ‘Ragged University events’ are setting up people as authorities on subjects is a misapprehension of what is happening – events are situations where people have come together to share what they have invested their time in. Read more

Digital Literacy Skills; Lifelong Learning by Anonymous

21st century stands witness to changing traditional learning patterns and a transition process happening in lifelong learning right now. Teaching and learning has evolved dramatically and theories like learner learning styles that were viewed as important back in 1990s are no longer considered impactful. Learning is no longer confined to formal educational institutions but it is now an open process reaching out to all in the society. My childhood learning can now be enhanced by adult learning in the community. Read more

Podcast: John Morrisons Collider Lesson Plan; How Would You Build Guerilla Education ? Provocation by Alex Dunedin

This is an audio recording of a lesson which John Morrison a practitioner and researcher working in the Digital Media and Interaction Design group in the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University.  Ever stimulating, it has been fascinating getting the opportunity to work alongside John as he plans his lessons and curriculum for his students. Read more

Podcast: Treasures in phone boxes; street games and play in the city by Jana Wendler

Play is a fundamental part of our lives: we play to socialise, to discover the world, to learn, to have fun or simply to play – until a certain age. Then, play becomes exceptional: something to do in certain places, at certain times, with certain goals and in clear opposition to our ‘normal’, ‘working’ lives. I find this shift intriguing – what is it about play that makes it such an ambiguous practice? And what can we do to reclaim its openness and enchantment?

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