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The Banking Game: Literature Review Part Three and Conclusion by Doreen Soutar

The Banking Game: Analysis of the extinction of the bank as trusted institution and NONIIs as an indicator of non-reciprocal strategies by Doreen Soutar. This is the third part of her literature review and conclusion to her investigation…

Retail Banking: a Co-Operative Model

The savings and loans banking division operates in a social environment which is built on repeated encounters, engendering the growth of mutual trust and cooperation (Motashemi & Mui, 2003). Here, customers are given to believe that the bank is essentially working for the augmented good of the group, where community wellbeing is the main focus rather than the wealth of the bank, as is implied in the statement by the CEO in Barclays’ annual statement (Diamond, 2010). This is not restricted to the equality of reciprocity of a single lender and the bank, but also applies to altruism “fed forward” in an emergent, and customers benefit at different times in differing amounts.

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The Banking Game: Literature Review Part Two by Doreen Soutar

The Banking Game: Analysis of the extinction of the bank as trusted institution and NONIIs as an indicator of non-reciprocal strategies by Doreen Soutar. This is the second part of her literature review…

Banking: A Dual-Strategy Model

The banking industry operates in two distinct environments: financial trading and retail savings and loans (Casu et al 2006) and this has in the past resulted in the banks developing two distinct behavioural patterns to cope with these environments: a competitive model and a cooperative model. The competitive model was suitable for environments such as the stock market, where the inhabitants agreed to fight each other for available resources. The cooperative model was more suitable for retail banking environment, where customers assume that there is a fundamental principle of honourable group-focused behaviour (King, 2010; Kennedy, 2010). Read more

Experiences of Food Poverty: Literature Review by Samuel Lindskog

This literature review sets out to explore some of the different discussions relevant to the subject of food poverty “in societies where systems for employment or welfare were thought sufficient to ensure universal food entitlement” (Dowler 1998:59), in other words, the industrialised global North, where food poverty is not a question of supply failure (Dowler and O’Connor 2011:45,47).

The review is arranged thematically and deals with the experience of food poverty in particular. Texts by government and charities have been limited to the UK, while some academic studies also look at other countries in the global North.

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Ethnocentricism and Country of Origin Effects: Literature Review by Doreen Soutar

The literature review is divided into three main sections: the first section looks at the background into models of purchasing behaviour developed out of psychological research, such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) proposed by Fishbein and Azjen (1975) and the Theory of Planned Behaviour (Azjen, 1991).

These psychological models began to adapted for use in business research in the late nineties and early 2000s with models developed by Kotler (2000) and Hawkins et al (2001). From simple early models, theories of purchasing behaviour have become more complex over the years, and have attempted to account for both rational and non-rational aspects of behaviour, as well as social and cognitive aspects of purchasing trends. Read more