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Claire J Hornby: An Exhibition

When my husband died, I thought my life was over. I certainly didn’t envisage that in less than three years I’d be having my own art exhibition! I didn’t even see myself as an artist at that time! I hadn’t picked up a paintbrush and painted since my A Levels, 22 years previously!

My journey back into art was via Art Journaling, which I learned from a lovely lady called Dyan Reavely (check out her videos on YouTube) in Harrogate. Art Journaling gave me the means to express my grief. It showed me that art didn’t have to be like what I learned at school but could be expressive and emotional. Read more

Manchester Medical Mission Affiliates to Charter Street Ragged School by Simon Ward

Here are my notes from when I went back to the archive to look up the Manchester Medical Mission which was affiliated to Charter Street Ragged School and Working Girls Home. It was situated on Red Bank which is on the opposite side of the Irk from Angel Meadow and is now called Green Bank. The information was all in the form of year books from 1901 to 1910. Their evangelising seemed a bit more aggressive than their Charter St counterparts and some of the language they used would now look inappropriate.

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Interview With An Educator: Julian Edge

This is an interview with Julian Edge, which took place in Manchester Central Library in July 2015.  Julian Edge has a long and rich career in teaching, and has later moved into counseling, he talks about how he came to education as well as the ways he sees us learning.  In the interview he takes us through the history of how he got into teaching, and where across the world he has taught; all time being drawn back in to learning as he meets a new set of problems. Read more

Podcast: Dyslexia in Post Industrial Manchester by Roger Broadbent

This is a recording of the talk given by Roger Broadbent in Manchester as part of the Ragged University project.  Dyslexia is a much misunderstood and ignored condition, and this leads to many people being marginalized and forced to the perifery of society.  The screening for dyslexia is almost entirely missing in Manchester leading to swollen prison populations due the disenfranchisement of individuals through a bureaucratic society.

Roger explores how the condition has been wholly dismissed by some politidans leading to a culture of ignorance in policy terms.  Roger works in learning support which is coming under further funding cuts at the moment.  These are his views on his work and how people with dyslexia should be supported Read more