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Recollections of John Pounds: The Children go to Southsea Common by Reverend Henry Hawkes

When we had passed through King James’s Gate, and were in High Street, I warmly thanked Mr. for all his kindness! and bid him Good Morning; for I wished to be alone; and think of all I had seen and heard of this good old man, I crossed the Grand Parade. The General was there, with his staff, trooping guard. Read more

Recollections of John Pounds: My Introduction to Portsmouth By Rev’d Henry Hawkes

The next morning, about ten o’clock, w were on our way to the old cobbler’s. It was a beautiful morning in May; the sun was shining bright, and the air was refreshing. Going out of High Street, by Golden Lion Lane, we entered St. Thomas’s Street, and turned to our right. “As you are new to Portsmouth,” Mr….. said, “it may perhaps be interesting to you if I point out some of the characteristics of this garrison town.” Read more

Recollections of John Pounds: Have you met the Old Cobbler ? By Rev’d Henry Hawkes

A few days after I came to reside at Portsmouth, in the spring of 1833, a lady said to me laughingly, “Have you been introduced to the old cobbler yet ?”. Seeing that I was at a loss to know whom she referred to; “O you must go and see the old cobbler;” she said in a somewhat more serious tone; but mingled with pleasantry’ “He’s a remarkable man’ quite a character! And does a great deal of good, in his own quiet, humble way. Read more

Podcast: The Ragged Schools of Angel Meadows by Simon Ward

This is a podcast of when Simon Ward gave a talk on the Ragged Schools of Angel Meadows and Manchester.  In the early 1800s, state contribution to education was less than the amount the government spent on the King’s stables. This talk will look at how The Ragged School movement led to the 1870 Education Act and state funding of universal education.

This is a podcast of Simon Ward talking at the Ragged University where he takes a closer look at two of Manchester’s Ragged Schools. Their fascinating history takes us from basket weaving, badminton and bombs to Suffragettes and Coronation Street. Read more

The History of Ragged Schools in Angel Meadow and Manchester

Due to the rapid industrialisation and urbanisation in Britain, and in particular Manchester, there was a need for the support structure given by Ragged Schools. The Ragged Schools provided Sunday school teaching, basic education, food and clothing to children who were too “ragged” to go to normal Sunday schools and church services.

Ragged schools were mainly run on non-denominational lines by evangelical groups. Charles Dickens commented that these schools were “not sufficiently secular, presenting too many religious mysteries and difficulties, to minds not sufficiently prepared for their reception”[1]. Read more

16th Oct 2014: The Ragged Schools of Angel Meadow by Simon Ward

Ragged School

Come along to The Castle Hotel at 7pm to listen to Simon’s talk. Share a crust of bread, and hear the reflections he has to share…

 

Title of talk:

The Ragged Schools of Angel Meadow

Bullet points of what you would like to talk about:

  • Brief outline of Ragged School movement
  • Brief overview of Angel Meadow history
  • Sharp Street Ragged School – from basket weaving to Coronation Street
  • Chartered Street Ragged School (previously Angel Meadow Ragged School)
  • Quick look at other Manchester Ragged Schools – link to suffragette movement “it is a great mistake to suppose domestic duties were limited to girls and women, every boy in Manchester should be taught to darn his own socks and cook his own chips”
  • Discussion

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