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16th Oct 2014: The Ragged Schools of Angel Meadow by Simon Ward

Ragged School

Come along to The Castle Hotel at 7pm to listen to Simon’s talk. Share a crust of bread, and hear the reflections he has to share…

 

Title of talk:

The Ragged Schools of Angel Meadow

Bullet points of what you would like to talk about:

  • Brief outline of Ragged School movement
  • Brief overview of Angel Meadow history
  • Sharp Street Ragged School – from basket weaving to Coronation Street
  • Chartered Street Ragged School (previously Angel Meadow Ragged School)
  • Quick look at other Manchester Ragged Schools – link to suffragette movement “it is a great mistake to suppose domestic duties were limited to girls and women, every boy in Manchester should be taught to darn his own socks and cook his own chips”
  • Discussion

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The Beginnings of Ragged by Will Bentinck

Grant and Jess introduced me to Al, because Al wanted to start organising some events, inspired by the Ragged Schools, and Grant thought I might like to help. I was hugely interested – I think education is the single most important thing – so joining a small team of friends on an exciting journey of experimenting with new ways of taking pleasure in learning and in teaching sounded like an opportunity I couldn’t miss.

Al, having planted the seed in our fertile minds, promptly left for Glasgow to continue inspiring others in to action. The three of us had many delicious long meetings in pubs, discussing the philosophy behind the idea and how we might deliver it. We decided on a local bar, The Palatine in Dalston, newly opened with a downstairs room we could use.

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Great Educator: Andrew Bell 1753 to 1832

Andrew Bell (1753 to 1832) was a Scottish Anglican priest and educationalist Founder of the Madras system of education (also known as “the monitorial system”) in schools and was the founder of Madras College, a secondary school in St. Andrews. Born 27 March 1753, he was the second son of a barber in St Andrews where a college in the university is still named after him to this day  Madras College. Read more

Education History: A Brief History of Ragged Schools

Ragged schools is a name commonly given after about 1840 to the many independently established 19th century charity schools in the United Kingdom which provided entirely free education and, in most cases, food, clothing, lodging and other home missionary services for those too poor to pay.  In many ways the movement embodied the notion of education as human development.

 

Often they were established in poor working class districts of the rapidly expanding industrial towns. Lord Shaftesbury eventually came to be the chairman of Ragged schools and championed the movement for thirty nine years.  Several different schools claim to have been the first truly free school for poor or ‘ragged’ people but free education is a tradition which spans time and culture.

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The Peer Led Teaching of the Ragged Schools

Before education was free for everyone in Britain, there were Ragged Schools. Beginning in the 18th century, philanthropists started Ragged Schools to help the disadvantaged towards a better life. During the 19th century, more people began to worry about neglected children and more schools were opened. These early Ragged Schools were started by merchants and communities and staffed by volunteers.
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