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Podcast: Interview with Richard Smith, Sustainability Manager at BBC

This is an interview with Richard Smith, a sustainability manager at the BBC who’s job it is to work with everybody at the BBC to help collectively reduce the environmental impact of the BBC. And because the main thing which impacts the environment is energy use, that is directly related to climate change and that was why he was in Manchester Museum taking part in the Climate Control exhibitions and events. Read more

Corporate MOTing: Hints and Tips on Interpreting Business Reportage Part Three: SWOTS, PESTS, and CSR by Doreen Soutar

So welcome to part three. A quick recap on the first two parts: if you get a hold of the annual accounts of any given company, it can tell you a fair bit about what the company is like. We can make a stab at telling how the senior executive team wants the reader to view the company, and how the company makes their money. Read more

What Is ‘Ecological Literacy’? by Susan Brown

“without significant precautions education can equip people merely to be effective vandals of the  Earth. If one listens carefully, it may even be possible to hear the Creation groan every year in late May when another batch of smart, degree-holding, but ecologically illiterate, Homo sapiens who are eager to succeed are launched into the biosphere” (Orr, 2004,p.5). Read more

Fine Wine, Future Generations And Notions Of Sustainability by Susan Brown

There is a lot of discussion of the term ‘sustainability’ and numerous definitions of the term. I’m not going to delve into a comparative exploration of these in this post. I’d like, instead, to explore a notion common to a number of definitions of sustainability:  that we need to pass on to future generations a World fit to live in (I include examples of such definitions at the end of the post).

Implicit in this notion is the belief that humans can care about the lives of those in a future beyond their lifespan. This belief runs contrary to the view that people find it difficult to envisage and/or care about a future in which they no longer play a part.  If this is the case, many definitions of sustainability can be seen as hopelessly naive. Read more

Sustainability Education: A Brief Introduction by Susan Brown

A warm welcome to this sustainability education blog written in association with the Ragged Project.  In the spirit of Ragged the main aspiration is to share emerging understandings/ideas/expertise in the field of sustainability education from a broad range of perspectives. My name is Susan and for me the question of how to approach sustainability education is a crucial one. It is fundamental to the way we negotiate the global challenges we now face.  It needs to be roundly and richly responded to and that is where I hope this blog will play a role. I work in a higher education context, where the question of how to effectively teach sustainability education is receiving increasing consideration.

This is also the case in secondary and primary education, and in a variety of formal and informal learning contexts in community, business and governmental sectors, both in the UK and around the globe. The greater the cross-pollination of understanding/ideas on sustainability education across sectors and cultural contexts, the better will be our educational response to the complex challenges we face.  I hope this blog will act as a conduit for such cross-pollination and welcome contributions to the blog in this endeavour. Read more

How Can Education Help To Shape A Steady State Culture?: A Discussion Paper by Susan Brown

In 2012 I was asked, to feedback on a draft report by Steady State Manchester on the role of education in shaping a Steady State Culture. I was asked, at that time, to feedback on that draft report. As someone who is invested in thinking about what constitutes good education in different contexts I was intrigued by the questions of what the educational landscape needs to look like to play a role in shaping a Steady State culture and what that role might be.

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