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Events management

Social and Educational Foraging and Gleaning: Only free open access events and activities get listed on the website…

 

Click on the event to get more information.  If you have an event or activity in Edinburgh which you want to put on the calendar email in the details.

 

Please check external event websites to confirm details and get tickets

 

Dec
27
Tue
Film Screening: Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid @ Grassmarket Community Project
Dec 27 @ 11:00 am
Film Screening: Charlie Chaplin's The Kid Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid @ Grassmarket Community Project | Edinburgh | Scotland | United Kingdom

Chaplin’s first full-length feature is a silent masterpiece about a little tramp who discovers a little orphan and brings him up but is left desolate when the orphanage reclaims him. Chaplin directed, produced and starred in the film, as well as composed the score.

Considered one of Charlie Chaplin’s best films, The Kid also made a star of little Jackie Coogan, who plays the boy cared for by The Tramp. When his mother, Edna, later has a change of heart and aches to be reunited with her son, she finds him and wrests him from The Tramp, making what turns out be one of the most heart-wrenching scenes ever included in a comedy film.

“In the modern age of voice-over and extreme close-ups, the silent medium offers a refreshing take on filmmaking, and viewers willing to try something they’re not used to will be paid back in full.” Common Sense Media

“Some wonderful comic sequences and Coogan’s cherubic charm that makes this very special.”  Empire Magazine

 

1921 CERTIFICATE U|RUNNING TIME 68 mins

Feb
15
Wed
Edinburgh Medical School: Let’s talk about health: Breast cancer; the advent of personalised medicine @ Queen's Medical Research Institute
Feb 15 @ 4:30 pm – 6:45 pm
Edinburgh Medical School: Let’s talk about health: Breast cancer; the advent of personalised medicine @ Queen's Medical Research Institute | Scotland | United Kingdom

“Let’s Talk About Health” is all about advancing our knowledge of health and what goes wrong in disease. Join us to hear about new research in our University that is increasing our understanding of diseases and providing new advances in treatment. Guests will be able to talk to our young scientists about their research, and S4 and S5 pupils will have an opportunity to tour our labs before the talks. We look forward to seeing you there!

Professor Karen Chapman

University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science

Most people associate breast cancer with women. However, men can also be affected. Currently, 1 in 8 women in the UK will be affected by breast cancer during their lifetime. Huge steps have been made in understanding some of the complexities underpinning this disease and developing increasingly effective treatment strategies. This started here in Scotland, with Beatson’s discovery that in some women, removal of the ovaries can shrink tumours. Join us to hear about some of the key advances that have led to over 85% of women now living more than 5 years after diagnosis of breast cancer. We will explore exciting research aimed at developing new treatment strategies, that are personalised to the individual patient’s cancer, to maximise treatment effectiveness and limit unpleasant side-effects.

Speakers

Dr Helen Creedon, and Professor Val Brunton, Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, The University of Edinburgh

Doors open 4.30pm with teas and coffees available.

Refreshments available after event.

Photography & filming

This event may be photographed and/or recorded for promotional or recruitment materials for the University or University approved third parties.

For any further information contact the organiser, Karen Chapman [email protected]

Mar
3
Fri
Facing the risks of war in Europe – Mountbatten Lecture by Sir Adam Thomson @ Playfair Library Hall
Mar 3 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Facing the risks of war in Europe - Mountbatten Lecture by Sir Adam Thomson @ Playfair Library Hall | Scotland | United Kingdom

Moutbatten Lecture: Sir Adam Thomson

Friday 3rd March 2017

Playfair Libray Hall, Old College, South Bridge

5.30 p.m. – 7.00 p.m.

Sir Adam Thomson, Director of the European Leadership Network will give this years Moutbatten lecture on “Facing the risks of war in Europe”.

Biography

Sir Adam Thomson was educated in history at Cambridge University and in Public Policy at Harvard University. He worked briefly at the World Bank before joining the British Diplomatic Service in 1978. In the course of the following 38 years he served abroad in British missions in Moscow, NATO Brussels, Washington DC, New Delhi, New York at the United Nations (where he was the No2 Ambassador), Islamabad (where he was the British High Commissioner) and NATO again (where he was the UK Permanent Representative).

In London over this period he served in the Cabinet Office as the Soviet analyst on the Assessments Staff 1989 -91 and in roles in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office covering the Mutual and Balanced Force Reductions, Israel/Lebanon, UK security policy (especially in Europe) and UK policy towards South Asia and Afghanistan. His two main areas of professional life have been politico-military affairs and South Asia, especially Pakistan/Afghanistan.

In November 2016, he left the UK Delegation to NATO, retired from the Diplomatic Service and took up his present job as the Director of the European Leadership Network, a pan-European, non-partisan, non-governmental organisation working for better security in greater Europe.

PLEASE NOTE:

You must bring your printed ticket with you to the event.

This event may be photographed and/or recorded for promotional or recruitment materials for the University and University approved third parties.

Mar
9
Thu
Paradoxes of the Popular: Despair and Democracy in Bangladesh @ 6th Floor staff room, Chrystal Macmillan Building
Mar 9 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Paradoxes of the Popular: Despair and Democracy in Bangladesh @ 6th Floor staff room, Chrystal Macmillan Building | Scotland | United Kingdom

This essay is located in the aftermath of protests against the War Crimes Tribunal in Bangladesh in 2013. Armed with the seemingly unstoppable energy of youth, the Shahbag Movement inaugurated a new culture of protest that eschewed violence, an otherwise regular feature of political performances in South Asia. Although its affective landscape has been commonly understood in terms of nationalist passion, I focus instead on what I call political despair. One major source of this despair has been the opposition between the atheist-blogger on the one side and the Islamist/extremist on the other.

The apprehension around the possible effects of this cleavage rested on the body, the first provocation of which comes from the death of a blogger. The dead-body politics that followed assumed and occasioned the atheist/religious divide and made way for more violence, including the murders of a number of religious activists and secular bloggers in the months and years to come. The other area where the body was a privileged site of politics was the presumed corporeal nature of non-secular politics. The physicality and irrationality of so-called religious affect became a marker of distinction between the protesters and their ideological opponents.  The particularities of this context allows me to argue that a sense of despair is not an anomalous but a constitutive element of modern mass democracies.

This essay is located in the aftermath of protests against the War Crimes Tribunal in Bangladesh in 2013. Armed with the seemingly unstoppable energy of youth, the Shahbag Movement inaugurated a new culture of protest that eschewed violence, an otherwise regular feature of political performances in South Asia. Although its affective landscape has been commonly understood in terms of nationalist passion, I focus instead on what I call political despair. One major source of this despair has been the opposition between the atheist-blogger on the one side and the Islamist/extremist on the other.

The apprehension around the possible effects of this cleavage rested on the body, the first provocation of which comes from the death of a blogger. The dead-body politics that followed assumed and occasioned the atheist/religious divide and made way for more violence, including the murders of a number of religious activists and secular bloggers in the months and years to come. The other area where the body was a privileged site of politics was the presumed corporeal nature of non-secular politics. The physicality and irrationality of so-called religious affect became a marker of distinction between the protesters and their ideological opponents.  The particularities of this context allows me to argue that a sense of despair is not an anomalous but a constitutive element of modern mass democracies.

Nov
16
Thu
Ragged University: ‘Anchor Institutions’ plus ‘Perception and Communication’ @ The Castle Hotel
Nov 16 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: 'Anchor Institutions' plus 'Perception and Communication' @ The Castle Hotel | England | United Kingdom

Come along to The Castle Hotel (66 Oldham St, Manchester M4 1LE) from 7pm. Come along for a bite of food, a chance to socialise and learn in an informal setting.  The event is free and there are two talks separated by a break…

 

Universities as Anchor Institutes – University of Manchester and Brunswick estate, a socially just model by Dr Carl Emery

Anchor institutions, also known as Eds and Meds (education and medical establishments), are generally understood as large geographically place based organisations that have been located in the community for generations and provide economic, social and cultural benefits to the locality in which they reside In this talk I will be setting the background of this initiative and examining some of the challenges and questions it raises. Why should the university adopt this role and if it does what are its motivations? Furthermore, how does this impact on issues of local democracy and accountability. Is there a danger that the university is simply propagating a neoliberal enterprise agenda and supporting the further privation of public services and spaces?

 

– Then there will be a break where we share food, fill our glasses and have some conversation before our second talk of the evening.  Everyone is invited to bring an item of food to put on the table to share, and help take away the food at the end of the evening so nothing goes to waste –

 

Objects, Perception and Communication by Mark Johnson

This is an activity involving mobile phones to capture photographs and video of objects in the room, or things which individuals have brought. Using a variety of analytical approaches, we will explore together the nature of objects and how they mediate the conversations we have and the ways in which we construct meaning in the world. We cannot imagine a world without objects – but what are they? and what are we that we recognise them? Objects illuminate the conversations we have with one another, and through our interactions with objects we learn about each other. How does this work? Since technology allows us to capture objects in various ways – through photographs, recordings, etc. we can collect objects together, explore their nature, and understand more about each other in the process.

 

All Ragged University events are free and open to everyone.  They are informal and relaxed, and you can come and go as you please