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Events management

Social and Educational Foraging and Gleaning: Only free open access events and activities get listed on the website…

 

Click on the event to get more information.  If you have an event or activity in Edinburgh which you want to put on the calendar email in the details.

 

Please check external event websites to confirm details and get tickets

 

Feb
15
Wed
Edinburgh Medical School: Let’s talk about health: Breast cancer; the advent of personalised medicine @ Queen's Medical Research Institute
Feb 15 @ 4:30 pm – 6:45 pm
Edinburgh Medical School: Let’s talk about health: Breast cancer; the advent of personalised medicine @ Queen's Medical Research Institute | Scotland | United Kingdom

“Let’s Talk About Health” is all about advancing our knowledge of health and what goes wrong in disease. Join us to hear about new research in our University that is increasing our understanding of diseases and providing new advances in treatment. Guests will be able to talk to our young scientists about their research, and S4 and S5 pupils will have an opportunity to tour our labs before the talks. We look forward to seeing you there!

Professor Karen Chapman

University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science

Most people associate breast cancer with women. However, men can also be affected. Currently, 1 in 8 women in the UK will be affected by breast cancer during their lifetime. Huge steps have been made in understanding some of the complexities underpinning this disease and developing increasingly effective treatment strategies. This started here in Scotland, with Beatson’s discovery that in some women, removal of the ovaries can shrink tumours. Join us to hear about some of the key advances that have led to over 85% of women now living more than 5 years after diagnosis of breast cancer. We will explore exciting research aimed at developing new treatment strategies, that are personalised to the individual patient’s cancer, to maximise treatment effectiveness and limit unpleasant side-effects.

Speakers

Dr Helen Creedon, and Professor Val Brunton, Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, The University of Edinburgh

Doors open 4.30pm with teas and coffees available.

Refreshments available after event.

Photography & filming

This event may be photographed and/or recorded for promotional or recruitment materials for the University or University approved third parties.

For any further information contact the organiser, Karen Chapman [email protected]

Oct
26
Thu
Ragged University: ‘Multilingualism As An Investment’ plus ‘The Philosophy of Daoism’ @ Cabaret Voltaire
Oct 26 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Ragged University: 'Multilingualism As An Investment' plus 'The Philosophy of Daoism' @ Cabaret Voltaire | Scotland | United Kingdom

Come along to Cabaret Voltaire (36-38 Blair St, Edinburgh, EH1 1QR), doors open at 6.30pm and the talks start from 7pm. Come along for a bite of food, a chance to learn about the philosophy of Daoism

 

Multilingualism; An Investment For A Better Society by Prof Antonella Sorace

Linguistics is the scientific study of language. Bilingualism/multilingualism is a research field focused on learning more than one language over the lifespan and its effects on brains and behavior. I am a professor of developmental linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. I’m the founding director of the research and information centre Bilingualism Matters, which makes research results available to different sectors of society and has 17 branches all over Europe and the US.

 

Then there is a break when we get the chance to eat something, have a drink and a chat.  Everyone is invited to bring an item of food to put on the table, and help take away the food at the end so that nothing goes to waste.

 

Daoism; How The World Works And How To Live In It by Jan Conway

Daoism is one of the oldest philosophies there is. It was written down in only five thousand Chinese characters by a respected teacher called Laozi (604-531 BCE) before he travelled to the West. Because the language it is written in is so ancient, scholars have made many different translations. There are a few books in English but they are rather difficult.I have been teaching Chinese culture for fifty years and trying to practise Daoism all that time. As the years have gone by I find it easier and easier to understand, and in recent years new discoveries in geology and astronomy hae confirmed everything that Laozi taught.

 

Jun
28
Thu
Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop @ Wellcome Auditorium,
Jun 28 @ 9:30 am – 12:30 pm
Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop @ Wellcome Auditorium,

Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop

Sep
24
Mon
Ragged University: The Green Man, The Work of Lucy Skaer by James Clegg @ Talbot Rice Gallery
Sep 24 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Ragged University: The Green Man, The Work of Lucy Skaer by James Clegg @ Talbot Rice Gallery

Come along to the Talbot Rice Gallery (The University of Edinburgh, South Bridge, Edinburgh EH8 9YL) at 11am to 1pm for a talk by James on Lucy Skaer’s art and a leisurely lunch kindly provided by the Talbot Rice Gallery. The event is open to all and a chance to hear thoughts in relation to the art which he helps curate…

The Green Man, the work of Lucy Skaer by James Clegg

Lucy Skaer’s exhibition The Green Man is an exploration of irrationality in collections. In the traditional museum, time is linear and free from ageing, order is presented and the body is absent. Skaer asks what happens if desire, change, empathy and fallibility were instead to become the organising principles. Throughout her practice, Skaer mines and manipulates pre-existing imagery – from art and history, as well as from her own oeuvre and personal history – transforming and destabilising relationships between materials and meanings. For this exhibition, Skaer has selected items from the collections of the University of Edinburgh, inviting fellow artists to inhabit the galleries of Talbot Rice alongside her – Fiona Connor, H.D., Will Holder, Nashashibi/Skaer and Hanneline Visnes.

To Skaer, the Green Man is a deeply irrational figure, spewing leaves and vines in place of language. Present in both pagan and Christian imagery, the Green Man made a resurgence after the plague, when wilderness and weeds took over much of the arable land. Skaer has selected items from the collection, bringing them into dialogue with her own constantly shifting works. Where before there was stability, she has opened windows into the Gallery, allowing light in that may cause them to sprout, grow and form a thicket of ideas. In calling the exhibition The Green Man, Lucy Skaer likens the spontaneous generation and evolution of form in artworks such as Sticks and Stones (2015–18) to the symbol of destruction and renewal found in carved stone faces made of leaves and vines.

Amongst this scene are: Hanneline Visnes’ paintings which comment on the representation and control of nature using stylised motifs of animals and plants; Will Holder’s interpretive re-publishing of H.D.’s Palimpsest; Nashashibi/Skaer’s film that revisits the tableaus of Gauguin; and Fiona Connor’s exposure of the Gallery’s secret places. All contribute to the exhibition’s exploration of collections, forms, print and language. The Green Man includes a number of new works commissioned by Talbot Rice Gallery for the exhibition, carving playful new ways for the collections of the University to speak to our visitors, and representing Skaer’s most in-depth exhibition in the UK to date.

A few paragraphs the speaker:

James is an Assistant Curator for Talbot Rice Gallery. Passionate about contemporary art he has curated and helped to curate lots of exhibitions for the Gallery since 2010. He is specifically interested in artists that work across disciplinary boundaries and he works hard to create meeting points for different types of practitioner and different types of audience. This includes public events that see academics, performers and poets coming together to create new dialogues around specific ideas. It also includes talks and tours with a range of different groups, including ones connected to the Scottish Refugee Council, Crisis Scotland and various colleges and adult education groups.