Navigate / search

What’s On

Events management

Social and Educational Foraging and Gleaning: Only free open access events and activities get listed on the website…

 

Click on the event to get more information.  If you have an event or activity in Edinburgh which you want to put on the calendar email in the details.

 

Please check external event websites to confirm details and get tickets

 

Feb
6
Mon
Meet the Edible Gardening Team
Feb 6 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Meet the Edible Gardening Team @ Scotland | United Kingdom

Take a look around our productive garden with the Edible Gardening Project volunteers. Find out what jobs need doing in your own garden now and have your vegetable growing questions answered.

Feb
7
Tue
Meet the Edible Gardening Team
Feb 7 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Meet the Edible Gardening Team @ Scotland | United Kingdom

Take a look around our productive garden with the Edible Gardening Project volunteers. Find out what jobs need doing in your own garden now and have your vegetable growing questions answered.

Feb
10
Fri
The LiveWell Plate: Healthy for People & Planet by Nourish Scotland and WWF @ Greyfriars Charteris Centre
Feb 10 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
The LiveWell Plate: Healthy for People & Planet by Nourish Scotland and WWF @ Greyfriars Charteris Centre | Scotland | United Kingdom

Nourish is partnering with WWF to launch their new Livewell Plate in Scotland.

Livewell presents a diet – the Livewell Plate – which is healthy for people and our planet. The aim is to show how sustainable diets can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from food supply chain – whilst being healthy, nutritious and affordable!

In Februray, WWF will be launching their revised Livewell Plate, which looks at the links between Food, Carbon, Land and Water to 2030.

As the Good Food Nation agenda gathers momentum in Scotland, join us to discuss WWF’s latest research on healthy, sustainable diets and how we can move Scotland’s eating habits to look after our health, our wildlife and our climate at the same time.

Join us for talks, discussion and some tasty, sustainable food.

Feb
13
Mon
Meet the Edible Gardening Team
Feb 13 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Meet the Edible Gardening Team @ Scotland | United Kingdom

Take a look around our productive garden with the Edible Gardening Project volunteers. Find out what jobs need doing in your own garden now and have your vegetable growing questions answered.

Feb
14
Tue
Meet the Edible Gardening Team
Feb 14 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Meet the Edible Gardening Team @ Scotland | United Kingdom

Take a look around our productive garden with the Edible Gardening Project volunteers. Find out what jobs need doing in your own garden now and have your vegetable growing questions answered.

Feb
15
Wed
Edinburgh Medical School: Let’s talk about health: Breast cancer; the advent of personalised medicine @ Queen's Medical Research Institute
Feb 15 @ 4:30 pm – 6:45 pm
Edinburgh Medical School: Let’s talk about health: Breast cancer; the advent of personalised medicine @ Queen's Medical Research Institute | Scotland | United Kingdom

“Let’s Talk About Health” is all about advancing our knowledge of health and what goes wrong in disease. Join us to hear about new research in our University that is increasing our understanding of diseases and providing new advances in treatment. Guests will be able to talk to our young scientists about their research, and S4 and S5 pupils will have an opportunity to tour our labs before the talks. We look forward to seeing you there!

Professor Karen Chapman

University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science

Most people associate breast cancer with women. However, men can also be affected. Currently, 1 in 8 women in the UK will be affected by breast cancer during their lifetime. Huge steps have been made in understanding some of the complexities underpinning this disease and developing increasingly effective treatment strategies. This started here in Scotland, with Beatson’s discovery that in some women, removal of the ovaries can shrink tumours. Join us to hear about some of the key advances that have led to over 85% of women now living more than 5 years after diagnosis of breast cancer. We will explore exciting research aimed at developing new treatment strategies, that are personalised to the individual patient’s cancer, to maximise treatment effectiveness and limit unpleasant side-effects.

Speakers

Dr Helen Creedon, and Professor Val Brunton, Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, The University of Edinburgh

Doors open 4.30pm with teas and coffees available.

Refreshments available after event.

Photography & filming

This event may be photographed and/or recorded for promotional or recruitment materials for the University or University approved third parties.

For any further information contact the organiser, Karen Chapman [email protected]

Feb
20
Mon
Meet the Edible Gardening Team
Feb 20 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Meet the Edible Gardening Team @ Scotland | United Kingdom

Take a look around our productive garden with the Edible Gardening Project volunteers. Find out what jobs need doing in your own garden now and have your vegetable growing questions answered.

Feb
21
Tue
Meet the Edible Gardening Team
Feb 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Meet the Edible Gardening Team @ Scotland | United Kingdom

Take a look around our productive garden with the Edible Gardening Project volunteers. Find out what jobs need doing in your own garden now and have your vegetable growing questions answered.

Feb
27
Mon
Meet the Edible Gardening Team
Feb 27 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Meet the Edible Gardening Team @ Scotland | United Kingdom

Take a look around our productive garden with the Edible Gardening Project volunteers. Find out what jobs need doing in your own garden now and have your vegetable growing questions answered.

Feb
28
Tue
Meet the Edible Gardening Team
Feb 28 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Meet the Edible Gardening Team @ Scotland | United Kingdom

Take a look around our productive garden with the Edible Gardening Project volunteers. Find out what jobs need doing in your own garden now and have your vegetable growing questions answered.

Jun
26
Mon
Ragged University: ‘Historical Manchester Sounds’ plus ‘Psychology of Dehumanization’ @ The Castle Hotel (
Jun 26 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: 'Historical Manchester Sounds' plus 'Psychology of Dehumanization' @ The Castle Hotel ( | England | United Kingdom

Come along to The Castle Hotel for a bite of food, a chance to socialise and a couple of talks as well as a chance to socialise…

Manchester Sound(s); Silent Notes From the Past by Dominique Tessier

Following on from my Ragged talk on Manchester History where I explored the Mancunian branches of ex-Prime Minister David Cameron’s family tree, I’m turning my local history attentions to a musical history of Manchester, reflecting on the roots and compositions of Manchester Sound(s) and the silent notes of the past..

 

In the break there is some food provided and everyone is welcome to bring along an item of food to put on the table to share, and also take away what they will eat at the end. 

The Psychology of Dehumanization by Alex Dunedin

How much we relate to others as human defines how we interact with the social world and what opportunities are conferred on us.  How human we appear in the eyes of others dictates how we will be treated.  When people are stripped of being perceived as human hurt and harm is visited upon them.  At the extreme end of dehumanization behaviours we find the unspeakable atrocities of genocide where groups of people have been devalued.

Prejudices take root in apathies, and it seems that simple apathy can be enough to manifest behaviours which dementalize and depersonalize individuals.  The psychology of dehumanization is related to how we encounter the world through our experience and our senses.  Sometimes it takes as little as a question to cause someone to completely re-adjust their perception of a group of people.  This is very positive when we think of the worrying things which can come about if such ignorance is left unchecked.

 

 

 

Click Here To Join The Meetup Group

All are welcome and it is free

Jun
5
Tue
Ragged University: Music, Mathematics and the Harmony of the Spheres by Hugh Peters @ The Castle Hotel
Jun 5 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: Music, Mathematics and the Harmony of the Spheres by Hugh Peters @ The Castle Hotel

You are invited to the open event at The Castle Hotel  (66 Oldham St, Manchester, M4 1LE) on the 5th June 2018 from 7pm to 10pm to enjoy a talk, some food and some music.  It is an open door event, no tickets required; just come along, put your feet up and bring your friends.  Hugh Peters will be taking us on a journey through the history of music…

 

Music, mathematics and the harmony of the spheres by Hugh Peters

The Scientific Revolution, occurring in very broad terms between 1550 and 1750, is generally regarded as leading to the replacement of ‘magical thinking’ by the ‘scientific method’. This can however be seen as a much more ambivalent process, in which beliefs fluctuated and co-existed with each other, even in the minds of major scientists such as Newton and Hooke. Both these thinkers were profoundly influenced by the traditions of alchemy, astrology and the idea of sympathetic resonances throughout nature.

While mathematics certainly came to the fore in this period as the ‘language’ of science, this happened partly because of the ‘mystical’ belief persisting from the time of Pythagoras that numbers underlay the structure of everything in the cosmos. Further, music, in the form of ‘harmonic theory’, was a major factor in both practical investigations of and theorising about matter and material phenomena.

In this entertaining and non-technical talk, Hugh Peters explores 16th and 17th century thought, drawing on the work of Newton, Hooke and others and addresses the subjects of the ‘music of the spheres’ and the origins of Newton’s Principia. The speaker is an accomplished musician and will illustrate some of the concepts on the classical guitar.

 

 

The talk will cover:

  • The transition from ‘magical thinking’ to ‘empirical science’ 16th to 18th centuries.
  • The role of ‘harmonic theory’ in stimulating scientific practice and theory.
  • How innovation in music paralleled scientific developments.
  • How tuning and temperament, harmony and dissonance work.
  • Major scientists like Newton and Hooke dallied with music, and magical thinking informed Newton’s magnum opus, the Principia Mathematica.

 

A few paragraphs about Hugh:

I am a musician and mathematician who has worked for some time in community arts, further and higher education and as a gigging musician in the northwest of England. I am based in Manchester. I have performed with my own projects at the Manchester Jazz Festival in 2010 and 2016, the latter project being called Zamani. I currently work as an academic support tutor in the school of computing and engineering at the University of Huddersfield.

My interests include many kinds of music, the arts in general and science past, present and future. I am very interested in the common ground between artists and scientists in terms of observing nature accurately and applying creativity to what we observe. I am interested in promoting better public understanding of science in general and awareness of climate change in particular.

I am an experienced guitarist in various styles, especially classical guitar and jazz. Favourite guitarists include Julian Bream, George Benson, Pat Metheny and Jonathan Butler. I also play electric bass and piano. I compose music which combines elements of jazz, contemporary African influences and orchestral music.

 

 

Jun
28
Thu
Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop @ Wellcome Auditorium,
Jun 28 @ 9:30 am – 12:30 pm
Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop @ Wellcome Auditorium,

Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop

Jul
18
Wed
Ragged Uni: An Evening In Dialogue with Prof Antonia Darder on Critical Pedagogy @ St John’s Church Community Hall
Jul 18 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Ragged Uni: An Evening In Dialogue with Prof Antonia Darder on Critical Pedagogy @ St John’s Church Community Hall  | Scotland | United Kingdom

Come along to St John’s Church Community Hall (Princes St, Edinburgh EH2 4BJ), doors open at 6.30pm and the event starts from 7pm. Come along for a bite of food, and chance to listen to and discuss critical education with Antonia …

All are warmly invited to an evening in dialogue with Antonia Darder and other fellow critical educators exploring the relevance of Pedagogy of the Oppressed today and how we can draw greater value from this important text. This event is free and will offer a space to engage our hearts and minds around the opportunities and challenges for critical pedagogy today as well as hearing about Antonia Darder’s new Student Guide to Pedagogy of the Oppressed.  Visiting from America, this is a unique and valuable opportunity to connect with Antonia’s thinking…

 

This event brings together various learning communities in Edinburgh including Critical and Alternative Methods & Ideas Network for Action (CAMINA) and Adult Learning Project (ALP) and Ragged University for an evening with Antonia Darder to explore key questions in critical education and what they mean in our lives.

CAMINA is a learning community which is made up of people who value the experience of critical education to transform lives in a variety of contexts.  It brings together individuals interested the challenges associated in practicing critical education in meaningful and sustainable ways. Through creating links they grow a community through creating connections locally, nationally and globally.

caminaproject.weebly.com

ALP is a learning community which has been active in Edinburgh for over 30 years.  Inspired by the methods and teachings of Paulo Freire, the well known activist and educationalist from South America, the community sees learning as an integral part of daily living.  Providing a home for various groups and activities, the community explores and investigates the issues important to people in a co-operative way through sharing, teaching and dialogue.

alpedinburgh.btck.co.uk

Ragged University is a project based around getting people who love what they do to share their knowledge and skills in social spaces; from that we build.  The central idea is “Everybody is a Ragged University; a unique and distinct body of knowledge accredited with their life experience and with a membership of one”.  Through sharing in social spaces a learning community is developed and ways are explored of supporting people achieving what they want to achieve. Inspired by the Ragged Schools created by communities for communities prior to universal formal education, it seeks to carry forward this tradition of sharing.

www.raggeduniversity.co.uk

Three key questions will be examined in the evening:

What do we mean by critical pedagogy?

How is practicing critical pedagogy different in the current context compared to when Freire was writing?

What elements of Freire’s theory are still relavent and what elements might we question?

 

Sep
11
Tue
Ragged University: ‘Spinoza’s Spectacles’ plus ‘Germans in England 1860-1915’ @ The Castle Hotel
Sep 11 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: 'Spinoza's Spectacles' plus 'Germans in England 1860-1915' @  The Castle Hotel

Come along to The Castle Hotel (66 Oldham St, Manchester M4 1LE) from 7pm. Come along for some food, some socialising and an opportunity to learn in a relaxed atmosphere.  All are welcome along to this informal event – put your feet up and enjoy the journey…

 

Spinoza’s Spectacles: Philosophy, Science and the Dutch Masters by Josef Darlington

The Dutch Masters are an intriguing group in art history. Compared to other great artistic movements their work is rather quiet and insular. Not for them the wild experiments of the modernists or the celestial majesty of the renaissance. Instead, artists like Rembrandt and Vermeer focused on domestic interiors, reserved portraits and the exquisite play of light and shadow known as chiaroscuro.

Yet the Dutch Masters were working at a time of great change. The Dutch Republic carved a unique path between Catholic absolutism and Protestant iconoclasm, stumbling upon the invention of modern liberal capitalism along the way.

Dutch toleration and trade produced huge advancements in technology and learning; the understanding of architecture, accounting, music, mechanics and, importantly, optics were revolutionised. A new philosophy emerged to explain these breakthroughs, most eloquently summarised in the works of the artisan lens grinder Baruch de Spinoza.

A living example of the power of Dutch toleration, Spinoza’s works were banned by the Catholic church, denounced by Protestant preachers and he was cast out from the Jewish community for suggesting that God and Nature were one and the same.

Offered a prestigious position at the University of Amsterdam, Spinoza preferred to keep on making his spectacles and keep his philosophising as a hobby. This was in keeping with his Ethics, in which he argues that every individual is responsible for their own soul which no established church or institution could guarantee for them.

In this lecture I aim to demonstrate how the intimate domestic scenes common to the Dutch Masters reflect a view of the world in line with Spinoza’s materialism. The importance of light and shadow, the denial of myth and magic, and the preponderance of group portraiture all reflect the unique landscape of Dutch thought and being in the seventeenth century Golden Age.

 

 

And for the second talk of the evening…

Thinkers or Junkers? Germans in England 1860-1915 by Anne Hill Fernie

2017 has seen the sharp decline in UK German studies at all levels. A 13.2 drop at GCSE level, similar at ‘A’ level and undergraduates reading German has almost halved since 1997. It would appear ironic that in an age where Europe has never been closer geographically, our real sense of closeness to it culturally & emotionally widens.

As a result of this and continued media stereotyping of the ‘bad’ or ‘threatening’ German, many British are unaware of the completely different reputation that ‘our cultural cousins’ had before the onset of WW1 as a nation of ‘poets and thinkers’. Germans of all professions flocked to Britain from the 1860s onwards, becoming one of the largest immigrant groups and contributing immeasurably to British culture and communities of the time.

My talk will identify German nationals’ contribution to Manchester in particular but crucially, will try and pinpoint at what point the image started to curdle, from that of ‘poets and thinkers’ (Dichter und Denker) to that of ‘Judges and executioners’ (Richter und Henker) – a Eurotrope of aggression and domination that the country has never quite managed to shake off. The question posed is how to re-engage Britain with German culture – a culture so bound up with ours if only we knew…….

 

All Ragged University events are free and informal.  Everyone is welcome to bring along an item of food to put on the table to share and take away what is left at the end.