Navigate / search

What’s On

Events management

Social and Educational Foraging and Gleaning: Only free open access events and activities get listed on the website…

 

Click on the event to get more information.  If you have an event or activity in Edinburgh which you want to put on the calendar email in the details.

 

Please check external event websites to confirm details and get tickets

 

Jan
28
Sat
Lecture: Smarter Sentencing & Penal Policy: What Could and Should ‘the New Scotland’ Do? @ Godfrey Thomson Hall, Room G1, University of Edinburgh, Thomson’s Land Building
Jan 28 @ 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Lecture: Smarter Sentencing & Penal Policy: What Could and Should ‘the New Scotland’ Do? @ Godfrey Thomson Hall, Room G1, University of Edinburgh,  Thomson’s Land Building | Scotland | United Kingdom

Lecture: Smarter Sentencing & Penal Policy: What Could and Should ‘the New Scotland’ Do?

Speaker: Professor Cyrus Tata, Faculty of Law, Strathclyde University.

In post-referendum Scotland, it is widely argued that we should shift radically from an over-reliance on the expensive and ineffective imprisonment to community based options, especially in respect of relatively less serious offences.

The Justice Secretary, Michael Matheson, for example, has stated repeatedly that Scotland’s high use of imprisonment is ‘totally unacceptable’. Yet, while there appears to be a degree of consensus on the direction of travel, how do we get there?

  • How can, and should, Scotland achieve a radical reduction in the use of imprisonment?
  • Can change be achieved in a way which is just and meaningful, rather than appearing to be soft and spineless?
  • Can reform be practically and politically sustainable?
  • What does this mean for community penalties, imprisonment, victims, offenders and the public?

Join Cyrus Tata to discuss and debate the future direction of Scotland’s justice and sentencing policy.

Feb
15
Wed
Edinburgh Medical School: Let’s talk about health: Breast cancer; the advent of personalised medicine @ Queen's Medical Research Institute
Feb 15 @ 4:30 pm – 6:45 pm
Edinburgh Medical School: Let’s talk about health: Breast cancer; the advent of personalised medicine @ Queen's Medical Research Institute | Scotland | United Kingdom

“Let’s Talk About Health” is all about advancing our knowledge of health and what goes wrong in disease. Join us to hear about new research in our University that is increasing our understanding of diseases and providing new advances in treatment. Guests will be able to talk to our young scientists about their research, and S4 and S5 pupils will have an opportunity to tour our labs before the talks. We look forward to seeing you there!

Professor Karen Chapman

University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science

Most people associate breast cancer with women. However, men can also be affected. Currently, 1 in 8 women in the UK will be affected by breast cancer during their lifetime. Huge steps have been made in understanding some of the complexities underpinning this disease and developing increasingly effective treatment strategies. This started here in Scotland, with Beatson’s discovery that in some women, removal of the ovaries can shrink tumours. Join us to hear about some of the key advances that have led to over 85% of women now living more than 5 years after diagnosis of breast cancer. We will explore exciting research aimed at developing new treatment strategies, that are personalised to the individual patient’s cancer, to maximise treatment effectiveness and limit unpleasant side-effects.

Speakers

Dr Helen Creedon, and Professor Val Brunton, Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, The University of Edinburgh

Doors open 4.30pm with teas and coffees available.

Refreshments available after event.

Photography & filming

This event may be photographed and/or recorded for promotional or recruitment materials for the University or University approved third parties.

For any further information contact the organiser, Karen Chapman [email protected]

Feb
22
Wed
Circular Economy: Managing Resources Responsibly @ Out of the Blue Drillhall
Feb 22 @ 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Circular Economy: Managing Resources Responsibly @   Out of the Blue Drillhall | Scotland | United Kingdom

Scotland aspires to being a Circular Economy Nation – what does this mean for our economy, our civil society and citizens? How can we contribute? What impact might this approach have in reducing carbon emissions? What initiatives are leading the way?

The following speakers will set the scene followed by an opportunity for participants to set the agenda / explore ways forward.

  • Sophie Unwin, Remade in Edinburgh
  • Ylva Haglund, Zero Waste Scotland
  • Mike Turner / Fran Hutchinson, Swap & Reuse Hub (SHRUB) Co-operative.

Book online at https://te-22feb.eventbrite.co.uk

Please Like and Share on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/events/257172458011353

Jun
28
Thu
Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop @ Wellcome Auditorium,
Jun 28 @ 9:30 am – 12:30 pm
Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop @ Wellcome Auditorium,

Edinburgh Cancer Immunology Workshop

Oct
13
Sat
Ragged University: Prison and Dehumanisation; Film Screening and Talks on Crime, Prison and Us @ St John’s Church Community Hall
Oct 13 @ 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Ragged University: Prison and Dehumanisation; Film Screening and Talks on Crime, Prison and Us @ St John’s Church Community Hall

Come along to St John’s Church Community Hall (Princes St, Edinburgh EH2 4BJ), doors open at 2pm and the event starts from 2.30pm. Come along for a bite of food, a film screening and discussion on prison and dehumanisation…

 

Prison and Dehumanisation – film screening and talks on crime, prison and us

Bullet points of what you would like to talk about:

  • Film screening
  • Discussion on rehabilitation and the prison system
  • Discussion on reform and rehabilitation

A few paragraphs on your subject:

Prison and Dehumanisation – film screening and talks on crime, prison and us. Screening of award-winning prison documentary and talks by the director of Injustice, Tabitha Wilkins from Prison Rehabilitation Coordinator and Alex Dunedin from Ragged University. After a whirlwind roadshow of screenings across the UK the controversial documentary film Injustice will be screened at St John’s Church Hall on 13th October 2018.

At the moment there are 80,000 prisoners in England and Wales and more than 7,000 in Scotland, but who are these people and what happens to them?

Around half of prisoners have mental health issues, half have addition problems, nearly two thirds were unemployed, and nearly half were excluded from school as children. Each year in English and Welsh prisons are 40,000 assaults each year, with nearly a death a day in prison and a suicide on average every three days.

Prisons are not holiday camps!

Nor do prisons reduce crime – around half of people released from prison reoffend within the first year. People released from prison are given £46 to survive and face enormous difficulties in finding accommodation and employment on release, with homelessness and unemployment often compounding the problems that led them to prison in the first place.

There are around 10 million people with convictions in the UK at the moment, leading us to ask – if the prison system doesn’t reduce crime or rehabilitate people, what’s the point of it?

Ultimately we are locked into a prison system that the public and media promote as a system of punishment and vengeance against those who have made mistakes. Finding a way out of this mess is key to creating a safer society for all of its members. Yet successive governments seem beholden to the press narrative about crime and punishment, which in the past 300 years has never succeeded in achieving its stated aims.

Governmental inaction means that crime rates continue to be high, people who’ve committed crimes are as likely as ever to be excluded from society and driven into further criminal activity and in the mean time the public is being failed. We must address the question of crime and punishment as a society.

Outside England and Wales there have been successful initiatives address this perennial problem, whether by creating better societies in the first place, or creating a system that prioritises reform over harm. This even will provide and open space to listen and speak on the issues that affect us all.

The award-winning film Injustice investigates the prison and criminal justice system, interviewing ex- prisoners, campaigners and academics to shine a light on this dark zone of our society, asking who the prisoners are, how the criminal justice system treats them, what happens in prison and what life is like on release. The Prison Rehab Company and Dr Wood join the panel discussion to report on their work with prisoners and give insight to the reality of the prison system.

About the panel:

Lee Salter is the director of Injustice

Lee Salter is a film maker, writer and researcher. After his 15-year academic career came crashing to a half with his 2016 conviction, he immersed himself in the worlds of the fellow convicts he found himself among. Taking notes of each story he encountered he began writing about the lifeworld of people with convictions, and began making contacts with a range of ex prisoners. Having made 3 feature documentaries in the style of Third Cinema he interviewed the “ex-prisoner” Gethin Jones while making a film to help launch his consultancy Unlocking Potential, and followed the leads he generated, which eventually led to the production of the documentary Injustice.

 

Tabitha Wilkins is the founder of the Prison Rehab Company

My name is Tabitha and I am the “Prison Rehabilitation Coordinator”. I like to think of myself as a jack of all trades, and have had many job roles over the years! I have taught young offenders, facilitated addiction groups, managed community order offenders and worked in bail hostels with prison leavers. I have been involved with the homeless community for the last 8 years, and am also a qualified social worker – currently practicing in a child protection team. I have personally experienced a variety of challenging circumstances throughout my life, and feel that these struggles have allowed me to become a resilient, empathetic practitioner who can work with people from any walk of life without judgement.