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Events management

Social and Educational Foraging and Gleaning: Only free open access events and activities get listed on the website…

 

Click on the event to get more information.  If you have an event or activity in Edinburgh which you want to put on the calendar email in the details.

 

Please check external event websites to confirm details and get tickets

 

Mar
8
Wed
Political women in the early United States: International Women’s Day lecture @ National Library of Scotland
Mar 8 @ 6:00 pm
Political women in the early United States: International Women's Day lecture @ National Library of Scotland | Scotland | United Kingdom

Could women be political before they got the vote? ‘Yes’, says Catherine Allgor, Director of Education at the Huntington Library and noted scholar of women and politics. In the new capital of the United States during the early republic, white ruling class women borrowed heavily from English court culture to further their families’ political aims. In doing so, they built the structure that would support the United States’ future as a democratic nation-state.

Wednesday 8 March
18.00
Free. Book ‘Political women’ on Eventbrite or phone 0131 623 3734.

Sep
14
Thu
Ragged University: ‘News Stories and Popular Fiction’ plus ‘From the Problems of Our Nature’ @ The Castle Hotel
Sep 14 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: 'News Stories and Popular Fiction' plus 'From the Problems of Our Nature' @ The Castle Hotel | England | United Kingdom

Come along to The Castle Hotel (66 Oldham St, Manchester M4 1LE) from 7pm. Come along for a bite of food, a chance to socialise and a talk about how news stories reflect on popular fiction plus alternative views in mental health…

 

The first talk is:

News Stories and Popular Fiction by Julian Edge

I’ve always wondered if I could write fiction. I mean, inventing characters and having them populate a context in ways that other people will want to read about? Over the years, I once or twice thought of interesting set-ups for a novel, but never followed them through. I started to develop a story, a fiction, something that did not relate to any real people, no, but which did, yes, draw on the documented fact that such events as I was imagining, and my characters were experiencing, were, in principle, possible.

None of it is “true.” It’s all made up. But it’s made up against the backdrop of some basic events that occurred. Is that permissible? Where does that leave the possibly injured feelings of some of the real people about whom I am not writing, but whose actions created a news context that fed the creation of the story?…

 

 

During the break there is a chance to share food, conversation and a bite to eat.  Everyone is invited to bring an item of food to put on the table to share, as well as take away what is left at the end.  The second talk follows the break:

 

From the Problems of Our Nature, to The Nature of our Problems by Rowland Urey

Having been involved greatly in championing a re-reading of the evidence bases for views and approaches, in particular for what gets treated as Obsessional Compulsive Disorder, I want to put forward that there is something fundamental missing from how we are understanding people caught up with these clinical terms and labels.

I argue that there as emerged in the last few years that there is absolutely no evidence base in Mental Health Universally for The Brain Disease, Medical Model which underpins psychiatric interventions and practice. And I will be presenting an Evidence Base Alternative based on Emotional and Social Trauma.

 

Come along and put your feet up, have a bite to eat and enjoy picking over the subject with Julian in good company.  As usual, everyone is welcomed to bring an item of food to put on the table to share, but there is no obligation to do so.  It is free and open to everyone, so you are welcome to bring your friends.  No need to book…

Apr
3
Wed
Ragged Uni: Betting on Famine – plus – The Free Project @ Gulliver’s
Apr 3 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged Uni: Betting on Famine - plus - The Free Project @ Gulliver’s

Come along to Gulliver’s (109 Oldham Street, Manchester, M4 1LW) at 7pm to listen to a couple of talks, share a crust of bread, and a chance to socialise around learning….

 

 

Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin

Jean Ziegler said in an interview with Gilles Toussaint: “There are more and more people who understand that hunger is man-made, that we live in a cannibal world-order maintained by multinational companies and their mercenary organizations, that is, the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization and the World Bank” – Jean Ziegler: “L’ordre cannibale du monde” Gilles Toussaint Publié le samedi 15 octobre 2011

In an interview with Philipp Löpfe for the Swiss national paper Tages-Anzeiger he said: “According to the World Food Organization, there is enough food on the planet for 12 billion people. If people still starve today, it’s an organized crime, a mass murder. Every five seconds a child under the age of ten starves to death and one billion people are permanently severely malnourished”

These quotes from the former United Nations special rapporteur to the Right to Food highlight the reality of human made famine. In this talk I am going to go through some of the research which he has published in his book ‘Betting on Famine; Why the world still goes hungry’ supplementing it with other information with the aim to have a conversation after the talk.

 

 

 

There will be some food provided and breaks to socialise.  All are invited to bring an item of food to put on the table to share and then take away what is left at the end so nothing goes to waste.

The Free Project; Opening Doors To Freedom by Emma Hammond

The Free Project CIC (Community Interest Company) was set up by myself, Dr Craig Hammond and another director several years ago after we realised that offering soup and socks out of the back of the car on a local car park was not enough. We had a team of volunteers and we sourced a building where we could offer daily opening hours. We had food, clothes, essential items as well as staff who were there to listen and offer a friendly face.

In Blackburn, where we ran the project, there are several privately run hostels. These establishments are run for profit and as such the welfare of the residents always seemed to take a back seat. I was incensed to hear the horror stories regarding the food and basic needs of individuals living in these places.

The project we ran was based on dignity, respect and non-judgement and as such we welcomed anyone from any background (over the age of 18) to our place. To come to sit and chat, or rest, to eat and get warm, to wash their clothes and get supplies of basics such a toilet roll and toothpaste. Unfortunately, after 5 years both volunteers and funding dried up and the project became unsustainable with 4 volunteers and no money to pay the rent and utilities. And we made the heart-breaking decision to close our doors and the outdoor Sunday night feed.

 

We hope that you can come along and join in the discussion…

 

Ragged Uni: Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin
Apr 3 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged Uni: Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin

Come along to Gulliver’s (109 Oldham Street, Manchester, M4 1LW) at 7pm to listen to Alex ’s talk. Share a crust of bread, and hear the reflections he has to share…

 

 

Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin

Jean Ziegler said in an interview with Gilles Toussaint: “There are more and more people who understand that hunger is man-made, that we live in a cannibal world-order maintained by multinational companies and their mercenary organizations, that is, the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization and the World Bank” – Jean Ziegler: “L’ordre cannibale du monde” Gilles Toussaint Publié le samedi 15 octobre 2011

In an interview with Philipp Löpfe for the Swiss national paper Tages-Anzeiger he said: “According to the World Food Organization, there is enough food on the planet for 12 billion people. If people still starve today, it’s an organized crime, a mass murder. Every five seconds a child under the age of ten starves to death and one billion people are permanently severely malnourished”

These quotes from the former United Nations special rapporteur to the Right to Food highlight the reality of human made famine. In this talk I am going to go through some of the research which he has published in his book ‘Betting on Famine; Why the world still goes hungry’ supplementing it with other information with the aim to have a conversation after the talk.

The way the stockmarket and multinational corporations are operating today is no doubt pathological. Understanding just how this form of finance functions in our world allows us to formulate how we respond to the problems which we are presented with. There are complexities which just are not spoken about like the role which pension funds play in the proliferation of scarcity as they are invested on our behalves in whatever returns dividends for the pension holder.

At the same time we are faced with a never ending series of charities and ‘voluntourism’ organisations which speak to us of helping underdeveloped nations in hard times. Which of these charities are also pressing for the lifting of economic restrictions on these ‘underdeveloped nations’ ? When organisations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank and multinational corporations are causing the hard times, what should be done ?

 

We hope that you can come along and join in the discussion… There will be some food provided and breaks to socialise

 

 

 

Ragged University: Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin @ Gulliver’s
Apr 3 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin @ Gulliver’s

Come along to Gulliver’s (109 Oldham Street, Manchester, M4 1LW) at 7pm to listen to Alex ’s talk. Share a crust of bread, and hear the reflections he has to share…

 

Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin

Jean Ziegler said in an interview with Gilles Toussaint: “There are more and more people who understand that hunger is man-made, that we live in a cannibal world-order maintained by multinational companies and their mercenary organizations, that is, the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization and the World Bank” – Jean Ziegler: “L’ordre cannibale du monde” Gilles Toussaint Publié le samedi 15 octobre 2011

In an interview with Philipp Löpfe for the Swiss national paper Tages-Anzeiger he said: “According to the World Food Organization, there is enough food on the planet for 12 billion people. If people still starve today, it’s an organized crime, a mass murder. Every five seconds a child under the age of ten starves to death and one billion people are permanently severely malnourished”

These quotes from the former United Nations special rapporteur to the Right to Food highlight the reality of human made famine. In this talk I am going to go through some of the research which he has published in his book ‘Betting on Famine; Why the world still goes hungry’ supplementing it with other information with the aim to have a conversation after the talk.

The way the stockmarket and multinational corporations are operating today is no doubt pathological. Understanding just how this form of finance functions in our world allows us to formulate how we respond to the problems which we are presented with. There are complexities which just are not spoken about like the role which pension funds play in the proliferation of scarcity as they are invested on our behalves in whatever returns dividends for the pension holder.

At the same time we are faced with a never ending series of charities and ‘voluntourism’ organisations which speak to us of helping underdeveloped nations in hard times. Which of these charities are also pressing for the lifting of economic restrictions on these ‘underdeveloped nations’ ? When organisations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank and multinational corporations are causing the hard times, what should be done ?

Come along listen and take part in the discussion