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Social and Educational Foraging and Gleaning: Only free open access events and activities get listed on the website…

 

Click on the event to get more information.  If you have an event or activity in Edinburgh which you want to put on the calendar email in the details.

 

Please check external event websites to confirm details and get tickets

 

May
31
Thu
Ragged University: The Philosophy of Mutual Recognition by Richard Gunn @ Cabaret Voltaire
May 31 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Ragged University: The Philosophy of Mutual Recognition by Richard Gunn @ Cabaret Voltaire | Scotland | United Kingdom

Come along to Cabaret Voltaire (36-38 Blair St, Edinburgh, EH1 1QR), doors open at 6.30pm and the talk starts from 7pm. Come along for a bite of food, a chance to discuss the philosophy of mutual recognition…

The Philosophy of Mutual Recognition by Richard Gunn

Presented in a quite detailed fashion will be the significance of ‘recognition’ as a theme in the writings of G.W.F. Hegel and Karl Marx. When I talk to Ragged on Thursday 31 May 2018, I do not attempt to dwell on textual details alone but develop a discussion and dialogue around the text I present.

Such an attempt would run the risk of being dry as dust. The written version dwells on textual detail as background to get this part of my remarks out of the way. My main aim when I am talking is to give my audience a sense of why ‘mutual recognition’ is an important term for me. With luck, the textual focus in my written version frees me up to emphasise more personal and substantive points.

 

 

The events are all informal and you can come and go as you please.  There is some food provided and you are warmly welcomed to bring along an item of food to put on the table to share, and help take away some at the end.

 

 

 

Jul
10
Tue
Ragged University: Discussion @ Scotts Monument, East Princes Street Gardens
Jul 10 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Ragged University: Discussion @ Scotts Monument, East Princes Street Gardens | Scotland | United Kingdom

The first venue where it was scheduled to take place was the Lighthouse Bookshop and they were approached and asked not to host the talk. The Mairi Oliver, one of the owners got in touch and said that they were not interested in hosting the discussion. As the coordinator, and having had a large number of conversations surrounding this it took a while investigating the subject matter, I sought another space to hold the event.

After booking St John’s church community hall, the person who objected to the event at the bookshop then contacted the church hall explaining their dislike for what was happening. The Associate Rector Stephen Holmes got in touch and declined the event from taking place on the grounds that he felt it might encourage people not to vaccinate.

All these things took place in the absence of any discussion, any prior communication and without any right to reply with either the speaker of the event (Mike McInnes) or the person who arranged the event (Alex Dunedin). This is unfortunate as it would have been much better to find out the objections and work through a co-enquiry about the issues (which will hopefully yet emerge).

At least two things are going on here. One which is of great interest medically and scientifically, and another which is of great interest sociologically, which warrant being examined here. Surrounding these we have larger issues of magnitude pertaining to what education and learning necessarily involve, as well as the issues of ethics which I believe should be both our means and ends…

Best wishes,

Alex Dunedin

Autism: The Plot Against Consciousness/Cognition/Language by Mike McInnes

For the first time in our evolutionary history children in colossal numbers are non-linguistic – around 35 million today and rising. Autism is a preventable condition caused by two principles – sugars in foetus and later, if that is not sufficient, by aluminium in vaccines

Autism exits only because the health establishment opted for the view (in 1973) that fats are toxic and sugars benign. The result was an explosion of diabetes/obesity/dementia – all of which are driven by the same mechanism – sugar suppression of glutamine synthetase – the enzyme that drives glucose into the brain – the hungry brain upgrades the appetite hormones and the cycle repeats…..endlessly……the more we eat the hungrier we become…

The role of the health establishment in this tragedy has been hidden for more than half a century. As diabetes/obesity/dementia exploded across the western world – a new condition appeared as if from nowhere – previously unknown in history – autism – it tracked these other conditions – but seemed initially not to be directly related.

 

 

 

 

Dec
16
Sun
Ragged University: ‘Civil War; Ranters, Quakers and Revolution’ plus ‘Loneliness and Social Isolation’ @ St John’s Church Hall
Dec 16 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Ragged University: 'Civil War; Ranters, Quakers and Revolution' plus 'Loneliness and Social Isolation' @ St John’s Church Hall

Come along to the St John’s Church Hall (Princes St, Edinburgh, EH2 4BJ) at 5.30pm for two talks, a bite to eat and some company. Join this friendly and informal gathering to discuss topics with food in good company. It is entirely free and open to everyone

Civil War; Ranters, Quakers and Revolution by Richard Gunn

My aim is to share with you the riches of a historical period. In the mid seventeenth century, Britain was plunged in a revolution. In the course of the revolution, ‘church courts and the censorship broke down. The result was an upsurge of popular and radical thinking – much of it thinking of an apocalyptic kind. (The term ‘apocalyptic’ is one which I shall explain but, in this note, I pass over it in silence.) Not the least important feature of the uncensored period of the civil war period is its impact on generations of subsequent radical thought.

Frequently, commentators on radicalism look back only to the early decades of the twentieth century, when Lenin and Luxemburg debated what was termed the ‘problem of organisation’. It is assumed that, beyond Lenin and Luxemburg, only nineteenth-century social democracy was worth considering. My proposal is that such a view of radicalism’s sources is too narrow.

The talk will be exploring the history of mid 17th century, Britain during a time of revolution, commentators of radicalism and the origins of radical and grassroots thought Ranters and Quakers.  There is an accompanying essay as a handout which gives people a deeper insight.

 

 

During the break there will be a chance to have some food and conversation.  You are invited to bring along an item of food to put on the table to share and help take it away at the end so that nothing goes to waste.  It is a bring your own bottle event.

 

Loneliness and Social Isolation by Alex Dunedin

There has been a great increase in the attention which has been paid to loneliness in the last few years.  Lots of research and charities has been formed around studying this social phenomenon as it badly impacts people’s health and wellbeing.  Lots of different factors seem to be involved in creating social isolation in the United Kingdom as the means for people being able to socialise and create social connections are becoming sparse.

The social and economic landscape of the UK has suffered from various kinds of fragmentation and this is now being seen in increases in the mental health issues, drug and alcohol addiction, a spike and rise in deaths due to overdose.  If we look at the rises in these problems their increase seems to be connected with the austerity policies, the rise in the costs of living, and the diminishment of social spaces available to people.

There is a parallel in behaviour and health when we look at what happens with animals that are kept in captivity.  The impact on cognitive function and the development of the brain is striking when we compare wild animals to domestic ones.  The development of stress behaviours and stress related illnesses is well known and understood in the context of keeping animals in zoos and aquariums; put simply, if they do not have the space and features of the environment which allow them to express their natural behaviours then they become ill and suffer behavioural problems.