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Social and Educational Foraging and Gleaning: Only free open access events and activities get listed on the website…

 

Click on the event to get more information.  If you have an event or activity in Edinburgh which you want to put on the calendar email in the details.

 

Please check external event websites to confirm details and get tickets

 

Apr
30
Mon
Mending myelin: orchestrating brain repair in MS @ Wellcome Auditorium
Apr 30 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Mending myelin: orchestrating brain repair in MS @ Wellcome Auditorium

In multiple sclerosis there is damage to the myelin sheaths of nerves (demyelination) which reduces the ability of nerves to conduct electricity and makes them prone to degeneration.

The brain can regenerate the myelin sheath (remyelination) which restores electrical conduction and protects the nerves. However, in people with multiple sclerosis, this repair system fails and we do not understand why.

In her inaugural lecture, Professor Anna Williams will discuss how studying human multiple sclerosis brain tissue and laboratory models of remyelination can increase our understanding of how this repair process works and why it fails. Understanding this better may lead to new therapies to improve remyelination and reduce disability in multiple sclerosis.

Nov
14
Wed
Ragged University: ‘What is Feminism’ plus ‘Teachers in Bangladesh’ @ The Castle Hotel
Nov 14 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: 'What is Feminism' plus 'Teachers in Bangladesh' @ The Castle Hotel

Come along to The Castle Hotel (66 Oldham St, Manchester M4 1LE) from 7pm. Come along for some food, some socialising and a two talks in an informal setting…

 

What is Feminism ? by Brigitte Lechner

What is feminism? Ask ten people this question and you might get ten different answers. It’s not that I claim to have the one right answer but rather that I do have one I have settled on and I am pleased to share it with Ragged members. My generation of women has seen enormous changes in our lives. I hardly recognise myself as the young woman who always sat quietly in one corner or another. To me, that is proof of feminism as an agent of personal growth and empowerment; one more reason to share what I know about it.

Feminism to me is a political sisterhood because it aims to challenge the dominant social force generally known as patriarchy. Some people get very precise and define it as capitalist patriarchy or imperialist capitalist patriarchy, even imperialist patriarchal capitalism. I suppose one’s view is always determined by where one stands.

My talk therefore aims to clarify what a plain and simple patriarchal society is, how it is structured and how feminists have over time risen to the challenge of the ways in which patriarchy disempowers and even harms women as a sex class; a thing feminists call patriarchal oppression. Moreover, whilst women are doing different things differently today than they did fifty years ago they are still doing it for themselves and often for men as well. Mine will be a whistle-stop tour through an immensely rich and complex cultural landscape but I hope there will be enough time left to take questions.

 

 

During the break we have a bite to eat and a chance to socialise.  Everyone is welcome to bring an item of food to put on the table to share and take away what is left at the end so nothing goes to waste

 

Teachers in Bangladesh; Ways of Seeing and Expressing Reality by Taslima Ivy

In this presentation I hope to share my story of researching ICT integration in education with rural female teachers from an island in Bangladesh. I will particularly focus on how I attempted to tap into teachers’ own ways of seeing, feeling and expressing life.

Firstly, I will talk about how I used multimodal artefact production- a method through which teachers have shared significant day to day experiences with me,- through a mode and genre of their choice-sometimes they chose images, sometimes video clips, audio clips while sometimes poems and journal entries.

Then I will talk about the distinct Bengali genre of ‘golpo/ adda’ (informal chatting) which I used in my research as an attempt to enable my participants’ experiences to emerge through their own discursive style. I will conclude by sharing how these two processes made me aware of my own ‘gaze’ and maybe helped me understand my participants from the position of a female-the position of a teacher- rather than the power position of a researcher.