Navigate / search

What’s On

Events management

Social and Educational Foraging and Gleaning: Only free open access events and activities get listed on the website…

 

Click on the event to get more information.  If you have an event or activity in Edinburgh which you want to put on the calendar email in the details.

 

Please check external event websites to confirm details and get tickets

 

Feb
11
Sat
Spotlight on Iran! Dr Friederike Voigt traces the history of the Iranian collections of National Museums Scotland @ Seminar Room (Learning Centre Level 4), National Museum of Scotland,
Feb 11 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Spotlight on Iran! Dr Friederike Voigt traces the history of the Iranian collections of National Museums Scotland @ Seminar Room (Learning Centre Level 4), National Museum of Scotland, | Scotland | United Kingdom

Senior curator  Dr Friederike Voigt traces the history of the Iranian collections of National Museums Scotland, from their beginnings in the 19th century. She will focus on the role of Scottish engineer and diplomat, Sir Robert Murdoch Smith, in building up the collections, and explore how ideas surrounding their development, research and display have changed. The talk will be complemented by a show and tell with a selection of objects from our collections.

Please click here to visit the museum’s website for further details.

Spotlight on Iran! 
Date: Friday 10th Feb 2017
Time: 14:30 – 16:00
Venue: The National Museum of Scotland, Chambers St, EH1 1JF, Seminar Room ( Learning Centre Level 4)
Entry: FREE Admission (Ticketed)
Box Office: call the museum on +44(0)300 123 6789 for booking)

Mar
2
Thu
Gender, mental health and disability rights in Asia @ 6th Floor Staff Room, Chrystal Macmillan Building
Mar 2 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Gender, mental health and disability rights in Asia @ 6th Floor Staff Room, Chrystal Macmillan Building | Scotland | United Kingdom

The seminar is about the linkages between Gender, disability rights and Mental health, from the point of view of low income communities; and drawing from advocacy experiences in Asia and program experiences in Pune, India. The Seminar is informed by developments in gender studies, disability studies, mad studies to set the scene for emerging questions. The disability movement since a decade, has been guided by the UNCRPD (United Nations Convention on the Rights of persons with Disabilities), which is hailed as the first treatise of the Millennium.

The Convention opened up the possibilities of a ‘paradigm shift’ in conceptualizing disabilities and recasting practices: Recognition of the experience of marginalization, and an unconditional policy shift towards inclusion of persons with mental health problems and psychosocial disabilities are expected to happen, under this new international policy frame.

Those traditional identity mantles of ‘user survivor’, ‘consumer’, ‘mentally ill’, etc. are being contested by disabled people’s voices from the global south, as an indicator of over-medicalization and not as an indicator of political resistance. The first part of the seminar will focus on the normative challenges and opportunities found in present times, in Asia, for developing inclusive communities; and lessons learnt from various initiatives (both programmatic and advocacial) including the work we are doing in the Bapu Trust.

Biography

Bhargavi V Davar is a childhood survivor of the Indian mental asylums, being exposed to a variety of them for years in early childhood. Compelled by those early experiences, she completed her PhD in1993, from the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai on the ethical and epistemological foundations of the mental and behavioural sciences. Through her early years, she studied theories of freedom and consciousness, human physiology, psychology, buddhism, ‘anti-psychiatry’, and the philosophies of social sciences. Her research has been on gender, culture and disability studies, and making sense of modern mental health policy frames in India and Asia.

The impact of colonialism on mental health systems in post colonial times, in India, is also a big area of research interest. She has published works, including (co-author) Psychoanalysis as a Human Science (Sage, 1995); Mental health of Indian women (Sage, 1999); (ed.) Mental health from a gender perspective (Sage, 2001); Gendering mental healthKnowledges, identities, institutions (OUP, 2015). She is Director of the Bapu Trust for Research on Mind & Discourse, Pune; and Convenor for an Asia advocacy platform, called ‘Transforming Communities for Inclusion, Asia’ [TCI Asia]. She is a practising Arts Based Therapist and teacher; an international certified trainer of the UNCRPD; and an organic farmer. She lives with her daughter in Pune, India.

May
25
Thu
Ragged University: ‘How to Better Manage Mental Health’ plus ‘Lets Talk About Population Baby” @ Cabaret Voltaire
May 25 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Ragged University: 'How to Better Manage Mental Health' plus 'Lets Talk About Population Baby" @ Cabaret Voltaire | Scotland | United Kingdom

Come along and put your feet up at Ragged University, a free education project where everyone is welcome and we socialise around learning… It is informal and there is a bite to eat, you are also welcome to bring some food to share if you want.

 

How Creativity, Exercise and Nutrition can help to Better Manage Mental Health Conditions by Lou Lord

Research is telling us that mental health issues are on the rise yet society is still reluctant to talk in public. Admitting to having a mental health condition can have a profound effect on an individuals life. I have severe Bipolar Affective Disorder. It nearly killed me. But it didn’t. My talk aims to openly discuss how I saved my life by taking responsibility for my disorder.

 

Click Here For More Information

 

Then there is a break where there is food provided… everyone is invited to bring an item of food to put on the table to share and at the end help take away what is left over.  There is no obligation though.  Drinks will be available from the bar

 

Lets Talk About Population Baby! by Brian Chrystal

The subject of human population growth has had an interesting history. Thomas Malthus was not the first person to talk on the subject. Ancient Greek scholars talked about population and its effects on resources. Paul Ehrlich published “The Population Bomb” in the 1968 and although his predictions have not come about yet they are looking more likely in the future. Humanity at present is like lemmings preening there fur coats before going over the cliff, but we are taking many other species with us. David Attenborough has stated that he can think of no environmental problem that would be easier to solve with fewer people.

 

Click Here For More Information

 

Click Here To Join The Meetup Group and get informed about upcoming events

Apr
23
Mon
Community Meal: Unsung Women of our Present Day @ City of Edinburgh Methodist Church
Apr 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Community Meal: Unsung Women of our Present Day @ City of Edinburgh Methodist Church

UNSUNG WOMEN OF OUR PRESENT DAY

Free Community meal and Talk

Community Meals are a casual, free event open to all and serve as an opportunity to bring the Edinburgh community together and celebrate our diversity.

EIFA is pleased to host the third Community Meal on Monday April 23rd at 6:30-8pm, we will be joined by a wonderful group of speakers to continue in the ‘Women of Faith’ series.

This week the ‘Women of Faith’ series will focus on the ‘Unsung Women of our Present Day’ in the diverse religious traditions who have inspired us and overcome boundaries, shining light on Women who are greatly admired but often forgotten.

This a free event, but with limited places please reserve your seat. If you have any questions please email [email protected]

We look forward to welcoming you for an evening of good company and good vegetarian food!

Sep
11
Tue
Ragged University: ‘Spinoza’s Spectacles’ plus ‘Germans in England 1860-1915’ @ The Castle Hotel
Sep 11 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: 'Spinoza's Spectacles' plus 'Germans in England 1860-1915' @  The Castle Hotel

Come along to The Castle Hotel (66 Oldham St, Manchester M4 1LE) from 7pm. Come along for some food, some socialising and an opportunity to learn in a relaxed atmosphere.  All are welcome along to this informal event – put your feet up and enjoy the journey…

 

Spinoza’s Spectacles: Philosophy, Science and the Dutch Masters by Josef Darlington

The Dutch Masters are an intriguing group in art history. Compared to other great artistic movements their work is rather quiet and insular. Not for them the wild experiments of the modernists or the celestial majesty of the renaissance. Instead, artists like Rembrandt and Vermeer focused on domestic interiors, reserved portraits and the exquisite play of light and shadow known as chiaroscuro.

Yet the Dutch Masters were working at a time of great change. The Dutch Republic carved a unique path between Catholic absolutism and Protestant iconoclasm, stumbling upon the invention of modern liberal capitalism along the way.

Dutch toleration and trade produced huge advancements in technology and learning; the understanding of architecture, accounting, music, mechanics and, importantly, optics were revolutionised. A new philosophy emerged to explain these breakthroughs, most eloquently summarised in the works of the artisan lens grinder Baruch de Spinoza.

A living example of the power of Dutch toleration, Spinoza’s works were banned by the Catholic church, denounced by Protestant preachers and he was cast out from the Jewish community for suggesting that God and Nature were one and the same.

Offered a prestigious position at the University of Amsterdam, Spinoza preferred to keep on making his spectacles and keep his philosophising as a hobby. This was in keeping with his Ethics, in which he argues that every individual is responsible for their own soul which no established church or institution could guarantee for them.

In this lecture I aim to demonstrate how the intimate domestic scenes common to the Dutch Masters reflect a view of the world in line with Spinoza’s materialism. The importance of light and shadow, the denial of myth and magic, and the preponderance of group portraiture all reflect the unique landscape of Dutch thought and being in the seventeenth century Golden Age.

 

 

And for the second talk of the evening…

Thinkers or Junkers? Germans in England 1860-1915 by Anne Hill Fernie

2017 has seen the sharp decline in UK German studies at all levels. A 13.2 drop at GCSE level, similar at ‘A’ level and undergraduates reading German has almost halved since 1997. It would appear ironic that in an age where Europe has never been closer geographically, our real sense of closeness to it culturally & emotionally widens.

As a result of this and continued media stereotyping of the ‘bad’ or ‘threatening’ German, many British are unaware of the completely different reputation that ‘our cultural cousins’ had before the onset of WW1 as a nation of ‘poets and thinkers’. Germans of all professions flocked to Britain from the 1860s onwards, becoming one of the largest immigrant groups and contributing immeasurably to British culture and communities of the time.

My talk will identify German nationals’ contribution to Manchester in particular but crucially, will try and pinpoint at what point the image started to curdle, from that of ‘poets and thinkers’ (Dichter und Denker) to that of ‘Judges and executioners’ (Richter und Henker) – a Eurotrope of aggression and domination that the country has never quite managed to shake off. The question posed is how to re-engage Britain with German culture – a culture so bound up with ours if only we knew…….

 

All Ragged University events are free and informal.  Everyone is welcome to bring along an item of food to put on the table to share and take away what is left at the end.

 

Nov
14
Wed
Ragged University: ‘What is Feminism’ plus ‘Teachers in Bangladesh’ @ The Castle Hotel
Nov 14 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: 'What is Feminism' plus 'Teachers in Bangladesh' @ The Castle Hotel

Come along to The Castle Hotel (66 Oldham St, Manchester M4 1LE) from 7pm. Come along for some food, some socialising and a two talks in an informal setting…

 

What is Feminism ? by Brigitte Lechner

What is feminism? Ask ten people this question and you might get ten different answers. It’s not that I claim to have the one right answer but rather that I do have one I have settled on and I am pleased to share it with Ragged members. My generation of women has seen enormous changes in our lives. I hardly recognise myself as the young woman who always sat quietly in one corner or another. To me, that is proof of feminism as an agent of personal growth and empowerment; one more reason to share what I know about it.

Feminism to me is a political sisterhood because it aims to challenge the dominant social force generally known as patriarchy. Some people get very precise and define it as capitalist patriarchy or imperialist capitalist patriarchy, even imperialist patriarchal capitalism. I suppose one’s view is always determined by where one stands.

My talk therefore aims to clarify what a plain and simple patriarchal society is, how it is structured and how feminists have over time risen to the challenge of the ways in which patriarchy disempowers and even harms women as a sex class; a thing feminists call patriarchal oppression. Moreover, whilst women are doing different things differently today than they did fifty years ago they are still doing it for themselves and often for men as well. Mine will be a whistle-stop tour through an immensely rich and complex cultural landscape but I hope there will be enough time left to take questions.

 

 

During the break we have a bite to eat and a chance to socialise.  Everyone is welcome to bring an item of food to put on the table to share and take away what is left at the end so nothing goes to waste

 

Teachers in Bangladesh; Ways of Seeing and Expressing Reality by Taslima Ivy

In this presentation I hope to share my story of researching ICT integration in education with rural female teachers from an island in Bangladesh. I will particularly focus on how I attempted to tap into teachers’ own ways of seeing, feeling and expressing life.

Firstly, I will talk about how I used multimodal artefact production- a method through which teachers have shared significant day to day experiences with me,- through a mode and genre of their choice-sometimes they chose images, sometimes video clips, audio clips while sometimes poems and journal entries.

Then I will talk about the distinct Bengali genre of ‘golpo/ adda’ (informal chatting) which I used in my research as an attempt to enable my participants’ experiences to emerge through their own discursive style. I will conclude by sharing how these two processes made me aware of my own ‘gaze’ and maybe helped me understand my participants from the position of a female-the position of a teacher- rather than the power position of a researcher.

 

 

 

Dec
16
Sun
Ragged University: ‘Civil War; Ranters, Quakers and Revolution’ plus ‘Loneliness and Social Isolation’ @ St John’s Church Hall
Dec 16 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Ragged University: 'Civil War; Ranters, Quakers and Revolution' plus 'Loneliness and Social Isolation' @ St John’s Church Hall

Come along to the St John’s Church Hall (Princes St, Edinburgh, EH2 4BJ) at 5.30pm for two talks, a bite to eat and some company. Join this friendly and informal gathering to discuss topics with food in good company. It is entirely free and open to everyone

Civil War; Ranters, Quakers and Revolution by Richard Gunn

My aim is to share with you the riches of a historical period. In the mid seventeenth century, Britain was plunged in a revolution. In the course of the revolution, ‘church courts and the censorship broke down. The result was an upsurge of popular and radical thinking – much of it thinking of an apocalyptic kind. (The term ‘apocalyptic’ is one which I shall explain but, in this note, I pass over it in silence.) Not the least important feature of the uncensored period of the civil war period is its impact on generations of subsequent radical thought.

Frequently, commentators on radicalism look back only to the early decades of the twentieth century, when Lenin and Luxemburg debated what was termed the ‘problem of organisation’. It is assumed that, beyond Lenin and Luxemburg, only nineteenth-century social democracy was worth considering. My proposal is that such a view of radicalism’s sources is too narrow.

The talk will be exploring the history of mid 17th century, Britain during a time of revolution, commentators of radicalism and the origins of radical and grassroots thought Ranters and Quakers.  There is an accompanying essay as a handout which gives people a deeper insight.

 

 

During the break there will be a chance to have some food and conversation.  You are invited to bring along an item of food to put on the table to share and help take it away at the end so that nothing goes to waste.  It is a bring your own bottle event.

 

Loneliness and Social Isolation by Alex Dunedin

There has been a great increase in the attention which has been paid to loneliness in the last few years.  Lots of research and charities has been formed around studying this social phenomenon as it badly impacts people’s health and wellbeing.  Lots of different factors seem to be involved in creating social isolation in the United Kingdom as the means for people being able to socialise and create social connections are becoming sparse.

The social and economic landscape of the UK has suffered from various kinds of fragmentation and this is now being seen in increases in the mental health issues, drug and alcohol addiction, a spike and rise in deaths due to overdose.  If we look at the rises in these problems their increase seems to be connected with the austerity policies, the rise in the costs of living, and the diminishment of social spaces available to people.

There is a parallel in behaviour and health when we look at what happens with animals that are kept in captivity.  The impact on cognitive function and the development of the brain is striking when we compare wild animals to domestic ones.  The development of stress behaviours and stress related illnesses is well known and understood in the context of keeping animals in zoos and aquariums; put simply, if they do not have the space and features of the environment which allow them to express their natural behaviours then they become ill and suffer behavioural problems.

 

 

Apr
3
Wed
Ragged Uni: Betting on Famine – plus – The Free Project @ Gulliver’s
Apr 3 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged Uni: Betting on Famine - plus - The Free Project @ Gulliver’s

Come along to Gulliver’s (109 Oldham Street, Manchester, M4 1LW) at 7pm to listen to a couple of talks, share a crust of bread, and a chance to socialise around learning….

 

 

Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin

Jean Ziegler said in an interview with Gilles Toussaint: “There are more and more people who understand that hunger is man-made, that we live in a cannibal world-order maintained by multinational companies and their mercenary organizations, that is, the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization and the World Bank” – Jean Ziegler: “L’ordre cannibale du monde” Gilles Toussaint Publié le samedi 15 octobre 2011

In an interview with Philipp Löpfe for the Swiss national paper Tages-Anzeiger he said: “According to the World Food Organization, there is enough food on the planet for 12 billion people. If people still starve today, it’s an organized crime, a mass murder. Every five seconds a child under the age of ten starves to death and one billion people are permanently severely malnourished”

These quotes from the former United Nations special rapporteur to the Right to Food highlight the reality of human made famine. In this talk I am going to go through some of the research which he has published in his book ‘Betting on Famine; Why the world still goes hungry’ supplementing it with other information with the aim to have a conversation after the talk.

 

 

 

There will be some food provided and breaks to socialise.  All are invited to bring an item of food to put on the table to share and then take away what is left at the end so nothing goes to waste.

The Free Project; Opening Doors To Freedom by Emma Hammond

The Free Project CIC (Community Interest Company) was set up by myself, Dr Craig Hammond and another director several years ago after we realised that offering soup and socks out of the back of the car on a local car park was not enough. We had a team of volunteers and we sourced a building where we could offer daily opening hours. We had food, clothes, essential items as well as staff who were there to listen and offer a friendly face.

In Blackburn, where we ran the project, there are several privately run hostels. These establishments are run for profit and as such the welfare of the residents always seemed to take a back seat. I was incensed to hear the horror stories regarding the food and basic needs of individuals living in these places.

The project we ran was based on dignity, respect and non-judgement and as such we welcomed anyone from any background (over the age of 18) to our place. To come to sit and chat, or rest, to eat and get warm, to wash their clothes and get supplies of basics such a toilet roll and toothpaste. Unfortunately, after 5 years both volunteers and funding dried up and the project became unsustainable with 4 volunteers and no money to pay the rent and utilities. And we made the heart-breaking decision to close our doors and the outdoor Sunday night feed.

 

We hope that you can come along and join in the discussion…

 

Ragged Uni: Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin
Apr 3 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged Uni: Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin

Come along to Gulliver’s (109 Oldham Street, Manchester, M4 1LW) at 7pm to listen to Alex ’s talk. Share a crust of bread, and hear the reflections he has to share…

 

 

Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin

Jean Ziegler said in an interview with Gilles Toussaint: “There are more and more people who understand that hunger is man-made, that we live in a cannibal world-order maintained by multinational companies and their mercenary organizations, that is, the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization and the World Bank” – Jean Ziegler: “L’ordre cannibale du monde” Gilles Toussaint Publié le samedi 15 octobre 2011

In an interview with Philipp Löpfe for the Swiss national paper Tages-Anzeiger he said: “According to the World Food Organization, there is enough food on the planet for 12 billion people. If people still starve today, it’s an organized crime, a mass murder. Every five seconds a child under the age of ten starves to death and one billion people are permanently severely malnourished”

These quotes from the former United Nations special rapporteur to the Right to Food highlight the reality of human made famine. In this talk I am going to go through some of the research which he has published in his book ‘Betting on Famine; Why the world still goes hungry’ supplementing it with other information with the aim to have a conversation after the talk.

The way the stockmarket and multinational corporations are operating today is no doubt pathological. Understanding just how this form of finance functions in our world allows us to formulate how we respond to the problems which we are presented with. There are complexities which just are not spoken about like the role which pension funds play in the proliferation of scarcity as they are invested on our behalves in whatever returns dividends for the pension holder.

At the same time we are faced with a never ending series of charities and ‘voluntourism’ organisations which speak to us of helping underdeveloped nations in hard times. Which of these charities are also pressing for the lifting of economic restrictions on these ‘underdeveloped nations’ ? When organisations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank and multinational corporations are causing the hard times, what should be done ?

 

We hope that you can come along and join in the discussion… There will be some food provided and breaks to socialise

 

 

 

Ragged University: Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin @ Gulliver’s
Apr 3 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Ragged University: Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin @ Gulliver’s

Come along to Gulliver’s (109 Oldham Street, Manchester, M4 1LW) at 7pm to listen to Alex ’s talk. Share a crust of bread, and hear the reflections he has to share…

 

Betting on Famine; Why The World Still Goes Hungry by Alex Dunedin

Jean Ziegler said in an interview with Gilles Toussaint: “There are more and more people who understand that hunger is man-made, that we live in a cannibal world-order maintained by multinational companies and their mercenary organizations, that is, the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization and the World Bank” – Jean Ziegler: “L’ordre cannibale du monde” Gilles Toussaint Publié le samedi 15 octobre 2011

In an interview with Philipp Löpfe for the Swiss national paper Tages-Anzeiger he said: “According to the World Food Organization, there is enough food on the planet for 12 billion people. If people still starve today, it’s an organized crime, a mass murder. Every five seconds a child under the age of ten starves to death and one billion people are permanently severely malnourished”

These quotes from the former United Nations special rapporteur to the Right to Food highlight the reality of human made famine. In this talk I am going to go through some of the research which he has published in his book ‘Betting on Famine; Why the world still goes hungry’ supplementing it with other information with the aim to have a conversation after the talk.

The way the stockmarket and multinational corporations are operating today is no doubt pathological. Understanding just how this form of finance functions in our world allows us to formulate how we respond to the problems which we are presented with. There are complexities which just are not spoken about like the role which pension funds play in the proliferation of scarcity as they are invested on our behalves in whatever returns dividends for the pension holder.

At the same time we are faced with a never ending series of charities and ‘voluntourism’ organisations which speak to us of helping underdeveloped nations in hard times. Which of these charities are also pressing for the lifting of economic restrictions on these ‘underdeveloped nations’ ? When organisations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank and multinational corporations are causing the hard times, what should be done ?

Come along listen and take part in the discussion