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A mote of dust suspended in a moonbeam
“….A mote of dust suspended in a moonbeam…”              – Carl Sagan

Ragged University is one of many, many free education projects which exist around the world.  We live at an amazing point in human history where never before has more information been freely available to so many.

The information tools available to us are more powerful than could have been imagined even a hundred years ago. With this in mind, you can find on the map below some other education projects and perspectives on education in this period of living history. This is not a map of affiliated projects, but a social document of disparate existing and past education initiatives.

Click the red markers to locate the projects on the map. Click the More Details link to be taken to the individual project websites.


 

 

It is a matter of time until higher education and the valuing of autonomous learners comes about as a universal and free part of every person’s life.

Particularly with the rise of the internet, ‘knowledge as a commons’ is understood all over the world, and each ‘project’, group or individual is carefully “negotiating the terms under which they can thrive” [Susan Brown]. This is interesting to take note of how people are reacting to the needs they have in their lives.  Part of the Ragged project is to reflect and document something of the actual conditions under which people exist.

Creating Capabilities The Human Development Approach by Martha C Nussbaum

It is a matter of time until what is referred to as ‘higher education’ is realised as a part of inalienable human rights and responsibilities; a chance to participate in a primary opportunity without endentureship attached.

Equal accessing knowledge and the right to participate in determining what is meaningful.  We live in times similar to the Victorian era which saw the Ragged Schools grow up; such wealth mixed with such poverty.

Much of the data for the map is constituted of the work carefully collated by Gary Saunders at the Lincoln Social Science Centre with a few other additions and an interface which links out to the various websites.